California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.2

Cover:  California's beef industry from early longhorn to today's modern beef animal (see centennial series article).
February 1975
Volume 29, Number 2

Research articles

Control of lemon trunk sprouts
by S. B. Boswell, R. M. Burns, C. D. McCarty, Isao Iwagaki
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Mechanical pruning of lemon trees leaves stubs around which buds sprout, producing vegetative growth which is usually unwanted. Hand pruning, which selectively removes unwanted limbs, does not cause as many buds to sprout, since pruning cuts are usually made at laterals. However, pruning of any kind causes a vegetative growth flush, and an immediate reduction in yield. On mature trees it would be of economic benefit on some occasions to stop, or at least reduce, this growth flush. Removal of trunk sprouts is important especially during the formative years, or if high scaffold limbs are desired.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Mechanical pruning of lemon trees leaves stubs around which buds sprout, producing vegetative growth which is usually unwanted. Hand pruning, which selectively removes unwanted limbs, does not cause as many buds to sprout, since pruning cuts are usually made at laterals. However, pruning of any kind causes a vegetative growth flush, and an immediate reduction in yield. On mature trees it would be of economic benefit on some occasions to stop, or at least reduce, this growth flush. Removal of trunk sprouts is important especially during the formative years, or if high scaffold limbs are desired.
Grapevine propagatlon: Improved field budding of grapevines using a modified cut and plastic tape
by C. J. Alley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field budding of grapevines has been practiced for years, especially in non-irrigated areas. The resistant rootstock becomes established more quickly and its roots explore the soil more quickly when it has its own top, rather than when it is a benchgraft with a different leaf system.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field budding of grapevines has been practiced for years, especially in non-irrigated areas. The resistant rootstock becomes established more quickly and its roots explore the soil more quickly when it has its own top, rather than when it is a benchgraft with a different leaf system.
Labor management for seasonal farmworkers
by J. W. Mamer, D. O. Rosedale
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
By applying modern labor-management practices in recruitment and management of seasonal labor, the Coastal Growers Association of Oxnard, California, has been able to meet its manpower needs without undue in creases in harvest costs and at the same time offer its employees substantially improved working conditions and earning possibilities.
Newly recognized Dying Arm Disease of grapevines
by W. J. Moller, A. N. Kasimatis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A dying arm disease of grapevine is important on some grape varieties in California. Leaf and shoot symptoms are readily apparent in mid-April, when healthy shoots are 6 to 12 inches long. Initially, single arms are affected, with the infection spreading to the main framework of the vine in succeeding years. Yield declines accordingly. The fungus causing apricot dieback (Eutypa armeniacae [impf. Cytosporina]) has been consistently isolated from diseased grapevine tissues.
Controlling sweet corn smut
by A. O. Paulus, H. W. Otto, J. Nelson, F. Shibuya
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several cultivars were found to have significantly less head smut than the commercial standards, Jubilee and Bonanza. Among the most highly resistant were Goldenrod, NCX 235, Silver Queen, 70–2367, 67–2750, E 1502 and 70–2021. NCX 243 would probably have greater commercial acceptance than the above cultivars but it was somewhat higher in susceptibility to head smut.
Alfalfa: Effects of seeding rates and Rhizobium inoculations
by William D. McClellan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A seeding-rate and Rhizobium-inoculation trial with alfalfa was established in Tulare County in 1972-73. The purpose of the trial was to examine stand persistence under three different seeding rates, and also to look at the effectiveness of inoculating the seed with the proper Rhizobium sp. (nitrogen fixing bacteria). The Rhizobizmz bacteria infect the root hairs of the alfalfa plant and develop into nodules in the roots. These nodules are responsible for “fixing” atmospheric nitrogen and changing it into a form that can be utilized by the plant.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A seeding-rate and Rhizobium-inoculation trial with alfalfa was established in Tulare County in 1972-73. The purpose of the trial was to examine stand persistence under three different seeding rates, and also to look at the effectiveness of inoculating the seed with the proper Rhizobium sp. (nitrogen fixing bacteria). The Rhizobizmz bacteria infect the root hairs of the alfalfa plant and develop into nodules in the roots. These nodules are responsible for “fixing” atmospheric nitrogen and changing it into a form that can be utilized by the plant.
Leafhopper—natural vector of citrus stubborn disease?
by G. H. Kaloostian, G. N. Oldfield, H. D. Pierce, E. C. Calavan, A. L. Granett, G. L. Rana, D. J. Gumpf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The citrus stubborn disease organism, Spiroplasma citri, has been transmitted from citrus to periwinkle plants by a leafhopper, Scaphytopius nitridus, which breeds on citrus in southern California. This is the first report of transmission of the stubborn disease organism by in-sects that acquired the organism by feeding on diseased citrus plants.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

To keep in touch
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.2

Cover:  California's beef industry from early longhorn to today's modern beef animal (see centennial series article).
February 1975
Volume 29, Number 2

Research articles

Control of lemon trunk sprouts
by S. B. Boswell, R. M. Burns, C. D. McCarty, Isao Iwagaki
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Mechanical pruning of lemon trees leaves stubs around which buds sprout, producing vegetative growth which is usually unwanted. Hand pruning, which selectively removes unwanted limbs, does not cause as many buds to sprout, since pruning cuts are usually made at laterals. However, pruning of any kind causes a vegetative growth flush, and an immediate reduction in yield. On mature trees it would be of economic benefit on some occasions to stop, or at least reduce, this growth flush. Removal of trunk sprouts is important especially during the formative years, or if high scaffold limbs are desired.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Mechanical pruning of lemon trees leaves stubs around which buds sprout, producing vegetative growth which is usually unwanted. Hand pruning, which selectively removes unwanted limbs, does not cause as many buds to sprout, since pruning cuts are usually made at laterals. However, pruning of any kind causes a vegetative growth flush, and an immediate reduction in yield. On mature trees it would be of economic benefit on some occasions to stop, or at least reduce, this growth flush. Removal of trunk sprouts is important especially during the formative years, or if high scaffold limbs are desired.
Grapevine propagatlon: Improved field budding of grapevines using a modified cut and plastic tape
by C. J. Alley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field budding of grapevines has been practiced for years, especially in non-irrigated areas. The resistant rootstock becomes established more quickly and its roots explore the soil more quickly when it has its own top, rather than when it is a benchgraft with a different leaf system.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field budding of grapevines has been practiced for years, especially in non-irrigated areas. The resistant rootstock becomes established more quickly and its roots explore the soil more quickly when it has its own top, rather than when it is a benchgraft with a different leaf system.
Labor management for seasonal farmworkers
by J. W. Mamer, D. O. Rosedale
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
By applying modern labor-management practices in recruitment and management of seasonal labor, the Coastal Growers Association of Oxnard, California, has been able to meet its manpower needs without undue in creases in harvest costs and at the same time offer its employees substantially improved working conditions and earning possibilities.
Newly recognized Dying Arm Disease of grapevines
by W. J. Moller, A. N. Kasimatis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A dying arm disease of grapevine is important on some grape varieties in California. Leaf and shoot symptoms are readily apparent in mid-April, when healthy shoots are 6 to 12 inches long. Initially, single arms are affected, with the infection spreading to the main framework of the vine in succeeding years. Yield declines accordingly. The fungus causing apricot dieback (Eutypa armeniacae [impf. Cytosporina]) has been consistently isolated from diseased grapevine tissues.
Controlling sweet corn smut
by A. O. Paulus, H. W. Otto, J. Nelson, F. Shibuya
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several cultivars were found to have significantly less head smut than the commercial standards, Jubilee and Bonanza. Among the most highly resistant were Goldenrod, NCX 235, Silver Queen, 70–2367, 67–2750, E 1502 and 70–2021. NCX 243 would probably have greater commercial acceptance than the above cultivars but it was somewhat higher in susceptibility to head smut.
Alfalfa: Effects of seeding rates and Rhizobium inoculations
by William D. McClellan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A seeding-rate and Rhizobium-inoculation trial with alfalfa was established in Tulare County in 1972-73. The purpose of the trial was to examine stand persistence under three different seeding rates, and also to look at the effectiveness of inoculating the seed with the proper Rhizobium sp. (nitrogen fixing bacteria). The Rhizobizmz bacteria infect the root hairs of the alfalfa plant and develop into nodules in the roots. These nodules are responsible for “fixing” atmospheric nitrogen and changing it into a form that can be utilized by the plant.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A seeding-rate and Rhizobium-inoculation trial with alfalfa was established in Tulare County in 1972-73. The purpose of the trial was to examine stand persistence under three different seeding rates, and also to look at the effectiveness of inoculating the seed with the proper Rhizobium sp. (nitrogen fixing bacteria). The Rhizobizmz bacteria infect the root hairs of the alfalfa plant and develop into nodules in the roots. These nodules are responsible for “fixing” atmospheric nitrogen and changing it into a form that can be utilized by the plant.
Leafhopper—natural vector of citrus stubborn disease?
by G. H. Kaloostian, G. N. Oldfield, H. D. Pierce, E. C. Calavan, A. L. Granett, G. L. Rana, D. J. Gumpf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The citrus stubborn disease organism, Spiroplasma citri, has been transmitted from citrus to periwinkle plants by a leafhopper, Scaphytopius nitridus, which breeds on citrus in southern California. This is the first report of transmission of the stubborn disease organism by in-sects that acquired the organism by feeding on diseased citrus plants.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

To keep in touch
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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