California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 25, No.8

Cover:  Hand hedging orange trees from truck-mounted platform. Effects of training and hedging are discussed on pages 12 and 13.
August 1971
Volume 25, Number 8

Research articles

Grazing management, and plant species selection emphasized in irrigated pasture studies
by J. L. Hull, C. A. Raguse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: One of the quickest ways a cattleman can increase his production per unit area on irrigated pastures is by improving management practices, including not only such things as the type, handling and health of the animals, but also cultural practices associated with the pasture, from seeding through harvesting, and including plant species selection.
One of the quickest ways a cattleman can increase his production per unit area on irrigated pastures is by improving management practices, including not only such things as the type, handling and health of the animals, but also cultural practices associated with the pasture, from seeding through harvesting, and including plant species selection.
Soil crusting effects on potato plant emergence and growth
by H. Timm, J. C. Bishop, J. W. Perdue, D. W. Grimes, R. E. Voss, D. N. Wright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Inorganic soils of the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys planted potatoes often crust in early spring. Crust strength and thickness are conditioned by the amount and intensity of rainfall, soil clod stability, and rate of drying of the soil surface. In the past there has not been much information about the extent to which crust development can affect plant performance. In the spring of 1970 the effects of severe soil crusting upon potato plant emergence and development were observed and recorded at Shatter.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Inorganic soils of the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys planted potatoes often crust in early spring. Crust strength and thickness are conditioned by the amount and intensity of rainfall, soil clod stability, and rate of drying of the soil surface. In the past there has not been much information about the extent to which crust development can affect plant performance. In the spring of 1970 the effects of severe soil crusting upon potato plant emergence and development were observed and recorded at Shatter.
Portable spray unit serves many farm and ranch purposes
by L. L. Dunning, E. C. Loomis, V. E. Burton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: For A number of years, many investigators in California have recognized the need for a portable, lightweight, low cost, effective spray unit that could be used in a variety of field tests–involving chemical treatment of livestock and poultry, barns and similar farm structures, accumulations of animal manures, as well as for field and row crops. A sprayer with such qualifications was needed to eliminate extensive time frequently required to calibrate, adjust, and repair local spray equipment when used in test work. Also needed as a sprayer with which multiple chemical or dilution applications could be made to test units without stopping to clean and refill tanks (as is necessary with conventional farm sprayers).
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: For A number of years, many investigators in California have recognized the need for a portable, lightweight, low cost, effective spray unit that could be used in a variety of field tests–involving chemical treatment of livestock and poultry, barns and similar farm structures, accumulations of animal manures, as well as for field and row crops. A sprayer with such qualifications was needed to eliminate extensive time frequently required to calibrate, adjust, and repair local spray equipment when used in test work. Also needed as a sprayer with which multiple chemical or dilution applications could be made to test units without stopping to clean and refill tanks (as is necessary with conventional farm sprayers).
Sugar beet yields increased by early planting, yellows-resistant varieties and aphid control
by F. J. Hills, W. H. Lange, J. Kishiyama
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A combination of control measures to reduce damage from “yellows” disease of sugar beets has resulted in yield increases of 42 per cent in the overwintering area of central California. The yield increases were made possible through earlier planting with suppression of sugar beet yellows through the use of a resistant variety, and aphid control.
A combination of control measures to reduce damage from “yellows” disease of sugar beets has resulted in yield increases of 42 per cent in the overwintering area of central California. The yield increases were made possible through earlier planting with suppression of sugar beet yellows through the use of a resistant variety, and aphid control.
Effect of training and hedging on yields of young Valencia orange trees
by S. B. Boswell, B. W. Lee, R. M. Burns, C. D. McCarty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The results of two trials initiated in Ventura County in 1960 show that severe training and hedging of young Valencia orange trees significantly decreased production. The data from trial 1 at Saticoy clearly show that production from the large number of trees per acre did not compensate for the fruit lost because of training and hedging. Although fruit loss was less at trial 2 near Somis, where the tree density was lower, it still remained too high for commercial acceptance.
The results of two trials initiated in Ventura County in 1960 show that severe training and hedging of young Valencia orange trees significantly decreased production. The data from trial 1 at Saticoy clearly show that production from the large number of trees per acre did not compensate for the fruit lost because of training and hedging. Although fruit loss was less at trial 2 near Somis, where the tree density was lower, it still remained too high for commercial acceptance.
Broccoli weed control studies
by B. Fischer, B. Hoyle, D. May
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although broccoli was cultivated L by the ancient Romans, it did not become a popular vegetable in the United States until about 50 years ago. It has been produced in California primarily in the coastal counties where the climate is moderate to cool. However, broccoli has also been grown on limited acreage in the Central San Joaquin Valley for harvest during the winter months. More recently, the fresh market and processing industry has become interested in the possible expansion of broccoli production in the Central Valley. Toward this end, extensive studies of varieties, time of planting, fertilization, and population. were conducted at the West Side Field Station, Five Points, and in cooperation with interested growers. Experiments were also conducted for the evaluation of many herbicides in the selective control of weeds in broccoli.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although broccoli was cultivated L by the ancient Romans, it did not become a popular vegetable in the United States until about 50 years ago. It has been produced in California primarily in the coastal counties where the climate is moderate to cool. However, broccoli has also been grown on limited acreage in the Central San Joaquin Valley for harvest during the winter months. More recently, the fresh market and processing industry has become interested in the possible expansion of broccoli production in the Central Valley. Toward this end, extensive studies of varieties, time of planting, fertilization, and population. were conducted at the West Side Field Station, Five Points, and in cooperation with interested growers. Experiments were also conducted for the evaluation of many herbicides in the selective control of weeds in broccoli.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Organic gardening …right for wrong reasons
by Boysie E. Day
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 25, No.8

Cover:  Hand hedging orange trees from truck-mounted platform. Effects of training and hedging are discussed on pages 12 and 13.
August 1971
Volume 25, Number 8

Research articles

Grazing management, and plant species selection emphasized in irrigated pasture studies
by J. L. Hull, C. A. Raguse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: One of the quickest ways a cattleman can increase his production per unit area on irrigated pastures is by improving management practices, including not only such things as the type, handling and health of the animals, but also cultural practices associated with the pasture, from seeding through harvesting, and including plant species selection.
One of the quickest ways a cattleman can increase his production per unit area on irrigated pastures is by improving management practices, including not only such things as the type, handling and health of the animals, but also cultural practices associated with the pasture, from seeding through harvesting, and including plant species selection.
Soil crusting effects on potato plant emergence and growth
by H. Timm, J. C. Bishop, J. W. Perdue, D. W. Grimes, R. E. Voss, D. N. Wright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Inorganic soils of the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys planted potatoes often crust in early spring. Crust strength and thickness are conditioned by the amount and intensity of rainfall, soil clod stability, and rate of drying of the soil surface. In the past there has not been much information about the extent to which crust development can affect plant performance. In the spring of 1970 the effects of severe soil crusting upon potato plant emergence and development were observed and recorded at Shatter.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Inorganic soils of the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys planted potatoes often crust in early spring. Crust strength and thickness are conditioned by the amount and intensity of rainfall, soil clod stability, and rate of drying of the soil surface. In the past there has not been much information about the extent to which crust development can affect plant performance. In the spring of 1970 the effects of severe soil crusting upon potato plant emergence and development were observed and recorded at Shatter.
Portable spray unit serves many farm and ranch purposes
by L. L. Dunning, E. C. Loomis, V. E. Burton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: For A number of years, many investigators in California have recognized the need for a portable, lightweight, low cost, effective spray unit that could be used in a variety of field tests–involving chemical treatment of livestock and poultry, barns and similar farm structures, accumulations of animal manures, as well as for field and row crops. A sprayer with such qualifications was needed to eliminate extensive time frequently required to calibrate, adjust, and repair local spray equipment when used in test work. Also needed as a sprayer with which multiple chemical or dilution applications could be made to test units without stopping to clean and refill tanks (as is necessary with conventional farm sprayers).
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: For A number of years, many investigators in California have recognized the need for a portable, lightweight, low cost, effective spray unit that could be used in a variety of field tests–involving chemical treatment of livestock and poultry, barns and similar farm structures, accumulations of animal manures, as well as for field and row crops. A sprayer with such qualifications was needed to eliminate extensive time frequently required to calibrate, adjust, and repair local spray equipment when used in test work. Also needed as a sprayer with which multiple chemical or dilution applications could be made to test units without stopping to clean and refill tanks (as is necessary with conventional farm sprayers).
Sugar beet yields increased by early planting, yellows-resistant varieties and aphid control
by F. J. Hills, W. H. Lange, J. Kishiyama
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A combination of control measures to reduce damage from “yellows” disease of sugar beets has resulted in yield increases of 42 per cent in the overwintering area of central California. The yield increases were made possible through earlier planting with suppression of sugar beet yellows through the use of a resistant variety, and aphid control.
A combination of control measures to reduce damage from “yellows” disease of sugar beets has resulted in yield increases of 42 per cent in the overwintering area of central California. The yield increases were made possible through earlier planting with suppression of sugar beet yellows through the use of a resistant variety, and aphid control.
Effect of training and hedging on yields of young Valencia orange trees
by S. B. Boswell, B. W. Lee, R. M. Burns, C. D. McCarty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The results of two trials initiated in Ventura County in 1960 show that severe training and hedging of young Valencia orange trees significantly decreased production. The data from trial 1 at Saticoy clearly show that production from the large number of trees per acre did not compensate for the fruit lost because of training and hedging. Although fruit loss was less at trial 2 near Somis, where the tree density was lower, it still remained too high for commercial acceptance.
The results of two trials initiated in Ventura County in 1960 show that severe training and hedging of young Valencia orange trees significantly decreased production. The data from trial 1 at Saticoy clearly show that production from the large number of trees per acre did not compensate for the fruit lost because of training and hedging. Although fruit loss was less at trial 2 near Somis, where the tree density was lower, it still remained too high for commercial acceptance.
Broccoli weed control studies
by B. Fischer, B. Hoyle, D. May
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although broccoli was cultivated L by the ancient Romans, it did not become a popular vegetable in the United States until about 50 years ago. It has been produced in California primarily in the coastal counties where the climate is moderate to cool. However, broccoli has also been grown on limited acreage in the Central San Joaquin Valley for harvest during the winter months. More recently, the fresh market and processing industry has become interested in the possible expansion of broccoli production in the Central Valley. Toward this end, extensive studies of varieties, time of planting, fertilization, and population. were conducted at the West Side Field Station, Five Points, and in cooperation with interested growers. Experiments were also conducted for the evaluation of many herbicides in the selective control of weeds in broccoli.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although broccoli was cultivated L by the ancient Romans, it did not become a popular vegetable in the United States until about 50 years ago. It has been produced in California primarily in the coastal counties where the climate is moderate to cool. However, broccoli has also been grown on limited acreage in the Central San Joaquin Valley for harvest during the winter months. More recently, the fresh market and processing industry has become interested in the possible expansion of broccoli production in the Central Valley. Toward this end, extensive studies of varieties, time of planting, fertilization, and population. were conducted at the West Side Field Station, Five Points, and in cooperation with interested growers. Experiments were also conducted for the evaluation of many herbicides in the selective control of weeds in broccoli.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Organic gardening …right for wrong reasons
by Boysie E. Day
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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