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California Agriculture, Vol. 22, No.2

Results of understory manipulation to reduce wildfire hazards and to improve aesthetic value oj giant sequoia at Whitaker’s Forest, Tulare County.
February 1968
Volume 22, Number 2

Research articles

Fuel conditions and fire hazard reduction costs in a giant sequoia forest
by H. H. Biswell, R. P. Gibbens, Hayle Buchanan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: In Recent Periods as long as 100 years, the groves of giant sequoia have been protected from destructive forces—including the fires which were once an integral part of their environment. There is today a growing concern that such protection, while of vital importance, is not of itself an adequate substitute for natural habitat conditions. Plant successions are changing conditions within the groves; the understory shade-tolerant trees, chiefly white fir, are increasing in number; and large amounts of debris are accumulating.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In Recent Periods as long as 100 years, the groves of giant sequoia have been protected from destructive forces—including the fires which were once an integral part of their environment. There is today a growing concern that such protection, while of vital importance, is not of itself an adequate substitute for natural habitat conditions. Plant successions are changing conditions within the groves; the understory shade-tolerant trees, chiefly white fir, are increasing in number; and large amounts of debris are accumulating.
Greenhouse assays diagnose sugar beet problems in delta soils
by A. L. Brown, F. J. Hills, B. A. Krantz, E. F. Nourse, Torrey Lyons
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Greenhouse tests point to potassium deficiency as the probable cause of “bronzing” of sugar beets in Delta soils, and indicate that responses to lime may be due in part to increased uptake of nitrates because of enhanced microbial activity.
Greenhouse tests point to potassium deficiency as the probable cause of “bronzing” of sugar beets in Delta soils, and indicate that responses to lime may be due in part to increased uptake of nitrates because of enhanced microbial activity.
Influence of feedlot pen design and winter shelter on beef cattle performance
by R. L. Givens, S. R. Morrison, W. N. Garrett, W. B. Hight
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Satisfactory winter gains were obtained with beef cattle in either concrete or dirt corrals when allowed 312 to 355 sq ft of space per animal, according to these tests. Animals given shelters and slatted floors gained as well in only 58 sq ft of space per animal, as did unsheltered animals in a dirt corral with 355 sq ft per animal. Stalls were of no benefit to beef cattle, as used in these tests, and in some cases actually reduced animal weight gains.
Satisfactory winter gains were obtained with beef cattle in either concrete or dirt corrals when allowed 312 to 355 sq ft of space per animal, according to these tests. Animals given shelters and slatted floors gained as well in only 58 sq ft of space per animal, as did unsheltered animals in a dirt corral with 355 sq ft per animal. Stalls were of no benefit to beef cattle, as used in these tests, and in some cases actually reduced animal weight gains.
Weeds in california fruit crops …a summary of problems and herbicide possibilities
by A. H. Lange
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: This report offers a brief summary of current herbicide usage and a review of the weed problems with reference to research results in California fruit crops. Herbicide weed control ratings of 70% or better in the tables are considered commercially acceptable. Listings of herbicides and rates in this article are not to be considered as University of California recommendations. There are many yet unregistered herbicides—and unregistered uses of herbicides—found effective in orchard research that are not discussed here. Current weed control recommendations are available at local county Farm Advisor offices.
This report offers a brief summary of current herbicide usage and a review of the weed problems with reference to research results in California fruit crops. Herbicide weed control ratings of 70% or better in the tables are considered commercially acceptable. Listings of herbicides and rates in this article are not to be considered as University of California recommendations. There are many yet unregistered herbicides—and unregistered uses of herbicides—found effective in orchard research that are not discussed here. Current weed control recommendations are available at local county Farm Advisor offices.
Effects of alar and top removal on yield of fresno strawberries at three digging dates
by R. E. Puffer, V. Voth, H. J. Bowen, R. H. Gripp
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The production of early strawberries is an important part of the strawberry industry in Los Angeles and Orange counties. Winter-planted (about November 1) strawberry plants produce earlier fruit but give lower total yield for the season than do summer-planted strawberry plants. In the 1964-65 season, many growers winter-planted the Fresno instead of the Lassen variety for its improved fruit quality.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The production of early strawberries is an important part of the strawberry industry in Los Angeles and Orange counties. Winter-planted (about November 1) strawberry plants produce earlier fruit but give lower total yield for the season than do summer-planted strawberry plants. In the 1964-65 season, many growers winter-planted the Fresno instead of the Lassen variety for its improved fruit quality.
Effects of covering materials and incorporated herbicides on lettuce stands under three irrigation treatments
by David Ririe, Harry Agamalian, L. J. Booher, Clay Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Current Cultural Practices in California lettuce require a thinned stand with single plants spaced 12 to 14 inches apart on a 40-inch double-row bed. The ideal situation would be to plant the precise number of seeds to obtain such a stand, but the many hazards to germination, emergence, and plant survival make it impossible to plant consistently to a stand. At present, it appears more practical to precision-plant fewer seeds than are now planted commercially—and then thin to the desired stand with a selective thinner. This is a progress report of work to develop such a planting system. Factors studied were irrigation techniques, chemical weed-control treatments, and the use of covering materials for soil-crust prevention. (Two planters were used, but no effort was made to compare the two machines.)
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Current Cultural Practices in California lettuce require a thinned stand with single plants spaced 12 to 14 inches apart on a 40-inch double-row bed. The ideal situation would be to plant the precise number of seeds to obtain such a stand, but the many hazards to germination, emergence, and plant survival make it impossible to plant consistently to a stand. At present, it appears more practical to precision-plant fewer seeds than are now planted commercially—and then thin to the desired stand with a selective thinner. This is a progress report of work to develop such a planting system. Factors studied were irrigation techniques, chemical weed-control treatments, and the use of covering materials for soil-crust prevention. (Two planters were used, but no effort was made to compare the two machines.)
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California Agriculture, Vol. 22, No.2

Results of understory manipulation to reduce wildfire hazards and to improve aesthetic value oj giant sequoia at Whitaker’s Forest, Tulare County.
February 1968
Volume 22, Number 2

Research articles

Fuel conditions and fire hazard reduction costs in a giant sequoia forest
by H. H. Biswell, R. P. Gibbens, Hayle Buchanan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: In Recent Periods as long as 100 years, the groves of giant sequoia have been protected from destructive forces—including the fires which were once an integral part of their environment. There is today a growing concern that such protection, while of vital importance, is not of itself an adequate substitute for natural habitat conditions. Plant successions are changing conditions within the groves; the understory shade-tolerant trees, chiefly white fir, are increasing in number; and large amounts of debris are accumulating.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In Recent Periods as long as 100 years, the groves of giant sequoia have been protected from destructive forces—including the fires which were once an integral part of their environment. There is today a growing concern that such protection, while of vital importance, is not of itself an adequate substitute for natural habitat conditions. Plant successions are changing conditions within the groves; the understory shade-tolerant trees, chiefly white fir, are increasing in number; and large amounts of debris are accumulating.
Greenhouse assays diagnose sugar beet problems in delta soils
by A. L. Brown, F. J. Hills, B. A. Krantz, E. F. Nourse, Torrey Lyons
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Greenhouse tests point to potassium deficiency as the probable cause of “bronzing” of sugar beets in Delta soils, and indicate that responses to lime may be due in part to increased uptake of nitrates because of enhanced microbial activity.
Greenhouse tests point to potassium deficiency as the probable cause of “bronzing” of sugar beets in Delta soils, and indicate that responses to lime may be due in part to increased uptake of nitrates because of enhanced microbial activity.
Influence of feedlot pen design and winter shelter on beef cattle performance
by R. L. Givens, S. R. Morrison, W. N. Garrett, W. B. Hight
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Satisfactory winter gains were obtained with beef cattle in either concrete or dirt corrals when allowed 312 to 355 sq ft of space per animal, according to these tests. Animals given shelters and slatted floors gained as well in only 58 sq ft of space per animal, as did unsheltered animals in a dirt corral with 355 sq ft per animal. Stalls were of no benefit to beef cattle, as used in these tests, and in some cases actually reduced animal weight gains.
Satisfactory winter gains were obtained with beef cattle in either concrete or dirt corrals when allowed 312 to 355 sq ft of space per animal, according to these tests. Animals given shelters and slatted floors gained as well in only 58 sq ft of space per animal, as did unsheltered animals in a dirt corral with 355 sq ft per animal. Stalls were of no benefit to beef cattle, as used in these tests, and in some cases actually reduced animal weight gains.
Weeds in california fruit crops …a summary of problems and herbicide possibilities
by A. H. Lange
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: This report offers a brief summary of current herbicide usage and a review of the weed problems with reference to research results in California fruit crops. Herbicide weed control ratings of 70% or better in the tables are considered commercially acceptable. Listings of herbicides and rates in this article are not to be considered as University of California recommendations. There are many yet unregistered herbicides—and unregistered uses of herbicides—found effective in orchard research that are not discussed here. Current weed control recommendations are available at local county Farm Advisor offices.
This report offers a brief summary of current herbicide usage and a review of the weed problems with reference to research results in California fruit crops. Herbicide weed control ratings of 70% or better in the tables are considered commercially acceptable. Listings of herbicides and rates in this article are not to be considered as University of California recommendations. There are many yet unregistered herbicides—and unregistered uses of herbicides—found effective in orchard research that are not discussed here. Current weed control recommendations are available at local county Farm Advisor offices.
Effects of alar and top removal on yield of fresno strawberries at three digging dates
by R. E. Puffer, V. Voth, H. J. Bowen, R. H. Gripp
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The production of early strawberries is an important part of the strawberry industry in Los Angeles and Orange counties. Winter-planted (about November 1) strawberry plants produce earlier fruit but give lower total yield for the season than do summer-planted strawberry plants. In the 1964-65 season, many growers winter-planted the Fresno instead of the Lassen variety for its improved fruit quality.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The production of early strawberries is an important part of the strawberry industry in Los Angeles and Orange counties. Winter-planted (about November 1) strawberry plants produce earlier fruit but give lower total yield for the season than do summer-planted strawberry plants. In the 1964-65 season, many growers winter-planted the Fresno instead of the Lassen variety for its improved fruit quality.
Effects of covering materials and incorporated herbicides on lettuce stands under three irrigation treatments
by David Ririe, Harry Agamalian, L. J. Booher, Clay Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Current Cultural Practices in California lettuce require a thinned stand with single plants spaced 12 to 14 inches apart on a 40-inch double-row bed. The ideal situation would be to plant the precise number of seeds to obtain such a stand, but the many hazards to germination, emergence, and plant survival make it impossible to plant consistently to a stand. At present, it appears more practical to precision-plant fewer seeds than are now planted commercially—and then thin to the desired stand with a selective thinner. This is a progress report of work to develop such a planting system. Factors studied were irrigation techniques, chemical weed-control treatments, and the use of covering materials for soil-crust prevention. (Two planters were used, but no effort was made to compare the two machines.)
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Current Cultural Practices in California lettuce require a thinned stand with single plants spaced 12 to 14 inches apart on a 40-inch double-row bed. The ideal situation would be to plant the precise number of seeds to obtain such a stand, but the many hazards to germination, emergence, and plant survival make it impossible to plant consistently to a stand. At present, it appears more practical to precision-plant fewer seeds than are now planted commercially—and then thin to the desired stand with a selective thinner. This is a progress report of work to develop such a planting system. Factors studied were irrigation techniques, chemical weed-control treatments, and the use of covering materials for soil-crust prevention. (Two planters were used, but no effort was made to compare the two machines.)

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