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California Agriculture, Vol. 20, No.4

Cultural control for Verticillium wilt in cotton
April 1966
Volume 20, Number 4

Research articles

Cultural control of Verticillium in cotton … a three-point approach
by S. Wilhelm, G. Evans, W. C. Snyder, A. George, D. Mathre, R. H. Garber, D. Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seed treatment, soil manipulation, and crop sanitation can help cotton growers of the San Joaquin Valley avoid severe losses from Verticillium wilt, according to recent studies. A sustained, well-coordinated combination of cultural practices is suggested as a basis for cultural control of Verticillium wilt in cotton.
Seed treatment, soil manipulation, and crop sanitation can help cotton growers of the San Joaquin Valley avoid severe losses from Verticillium wilt, according to recent studies. A sustained, well-coordinated combination of cultural practices is suggested as a basis for cultural control of Verticillium wilt in cotton.
Testing effects of low- vs. high-level protein concentrate mixes for dairy milk production
by S. E. Bishop, D. L. Bath
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A low-protein concentrate mix fed to part of the dairy herd in these tests resulted in a saving of $16.15 per cow per year as compared with costs of a high-protein mix —while maintaining at least equal milk production.
A low-protein concentrate mix fed to part of the dairy herd in these tests resulted in a saving of $16.15 per cow per year as compared with costs of a high-protein mix —while maintaining at least equal milk production.
For-hire trucking of exempt commodities by nonregulated carriers
by D. B. Deloach, Walter Miklius
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: No significant differences in the quality of trucking equipment were found in this comparative study of nonregulated, private, and regulated carriers competing for the same agricultural traffic. There were no significant vehicle-age differences among the three types of carriers. Each group used truck brokerage services to about the same extent and was able to obtain roughly the same share of the preferred, single-commodity loads. The average size of the nonregulated carrier firm, as measured by size of truck-tractor fleet, was relatively small, but has increased in the past five years. Driver-owner firms accounted for about 11% of the nonregulated carriers. There was no indication of significant instability in the nonregulated sector of the sample studied. However, the ability and apparent willingness of truckers to shift from one market to another to find business could be a stabilizing factor on the supply side of the transportation market.
No significant differences in the quality of trucking equipment were found in this comparative study of nonregulated, private, and regulated carriers competing for the same agricultural traffic. There were no significant vehicle-age differences among the three types of carriers. Each group used truck brokerage services to about the same extent and was able to obtain roughly the same share of the preferred, single-commodity loads. The average size of the nonregulated carrier firm, as measured by size of truck-tractor fleet, was relatively small, but has increased in the past five years. Driver-owner firms accounted for about 11% of the nonregulated carriers. There was no indication of significant instability in the nonregulated sector of the sample studied. However, the ability and apparent willingness of truckers to shift from one market to another to find business could be a stabilizing factor on the supply side of the transportation market.
Winter annual weed control with diuron in Antelope valley alfalfa hay
by D. M. May, C. L. Foy, W. D. Burge
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Diuron offers alfalfa growers the possibility of excellent control of winter annuol weeds, according to Antelope Valley tests, with no damage to the crop when properly applied. Clean alfalfa resulting from treatment returned $12 to $15 per ton more than weed-infested hay (including cost of treatment), and was also ready for a quick sale.
Diuron offers alfalfa growers the possibility of excellent control of winter annuol weeds, according to Antelope Valley tests, with no damage to the crop when properly applied. Clean alfalfa resulting from treatment returned $12 to $15 per ton more than weed-infested hay (including cost of treatment), and was also ready for a quick sale.
Research with parasites for biological control of house flies in southern California
by E. F. Legner, E. C. Bay, H. W. Brydon, C. W. McCoy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The introduction of new exotic species of larval and pupal parasites (probably from the Eastern Hemisphere) and the artificial distribution of existing parasites appear to offer the most immediate means for a more successful biological control effort in southern California, especially against Musca domestica, the most common of the house flies. Existing parasites are, how-ever, not as effective against this species as they are against Fannia and certain other species.
The introduction of new exotic species of larval and pupal parasites (probably from the Eastern Hemisphere) and the artificial distribution of existing parasites appear to offer the most immediate means for a more successful biological control effort in southern California, especially against Musca domestica, the most common of the house flies. Existing parasites are, how-ever, not as effective against this species as they are against Fannia and certain other species.
Water penetration in strawberries aided by seeding grain in furrows
by N. C. Welch, A. W. Marsh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Planting grain in furrows of strawberry fields counteracted compaction and increased water penetration in Riverside County tests. Adequate irrigation of the strawberries was maintained—along with frequent picking schedules—without holding water in the furrows for extended periods of time.
Planting grain in furrows of strawberry fields counteracted compaction and increased water penetration in Riverside County tests. Adequate irrigation of the strawberries was maintained—along with frequent picking schedules—without holding water in the furrows for extended periods of time.
Crossbred rams outlive purebred Suffolks and Hampshires in Glenn County Testing Program
by Monte Bell, G. E. Bradford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Crossbred yearling rams lived 20% longer according to experiments in western Glenn County than did their purebred Hampshire and Suffolk half-brothers. Mortality of all the yearling rams was high; 82% died before the fifth breeding season.
Crossbred yearling rams lived 20% longer according to experiments in western Glenn County than did their purebred Hampshire and Suffolk half-brothers. Mortality of all the yearling rams was high; 82% died before the fifth breeding season.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 20, No.4

Cultural control for Verticillium wilt in cotton
April 1966
Volume 20, Number 4

Research articles

Cultural control of Verticillium in cotton … a three-point approach
by S. Wilhelm, G. Evans, W. C. Snyder, A. George, D. Mathre, R. H. Garber, D. Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seed treatment, soil manipulation, and crop sanitation can help cotton growers of the San Joaquin Valley avoid severe losses from Verticillium wilt, according to recent studies. A sustained, well-coordinated combination of cultural practices is suggested as a basis for cultural control of Verticillium wilt in cotton.
Seed treatment, soil manipulation, and crop sanitation can help cotton growers of the San Joaquin Valley avoid severe losses from Verticillium wilt, according to recent studies. A sustained, well-coordinated combination of cultural practices is suggested as a basis for cultural control of Verticillium wilt in cotton.
Testing effects of low- vs. high-level protein concentrate mixes for dairy milk production
by S. E. Bishop, D. L. Bath
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A low-protein concentrate mix fed to part of the dairy herd in these tests resulted in a saving of $16.15 per cow per year as compared with costs of a high-protein mix —while maintaining at least equal milk production.
A low-protein concentrate mix fed to part of the dairy herd in these tests resulted in a saving of $16.15 per cow per year as compared with costs of a high-protein mix —while maintaining at least equal milk production.
For-hire trucking of exempt commodities by nonregulated carriers
by D. B. Deloach, Walter Miklius
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: No significant differences in the quality of trucking equipment were found in this comparative study of nonregulated, private, and regulated carriers competing for the same agricultural traffic. There were no significant vehicle-age differences among the three types of carriers. Each group used truck brokerage services to about the same extent and was able to obtain roughly the same share of the preferred, single-commodity loads. The average size of the nonregulated carrier firm, as measured by size of truck-tractor fleet, was relatively small, but has increased in the past five years. Driver-owner firms accounted for about 11% of the nonregulated carriers. There was no indication of significant instability in the nonregulated sector of the sample studied. However, the ability and apparent willingness of truckers to shift from one market to another to find business could be a stabilizing factor on the supply side of the transportation market.
No significant differences in the quality of trucking equipment were found in this comparative study of nonregulated, private, and regulated carriers competing for the same agricultural traffic. There were no significant vehicle-age differences among the three types of carriers. Each group used truck brokerage services to about the same extent and was able to obtain roughly the same share of the preferred, single-commodity loads. The average size of the nonregulated carrier firm, as measured by size of truck-tractor fleet, was relatively small, but has increased in the past five years. Driver-owner firms accounted for about 11% of the nonregulated carriers. There was no indication of significant instability in the nonregulated sector of the sample studied. However, the ability and apparent willingness of truckers to shift from one market to another to find business could be a stabilizing factor on the supply side of the transportation market.
Winter annual weed control with diuron in Antelope valley alfalfa hay
by D. M. May, C. L. Foy, W. D. Burge
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Diuron offers alfalfa growers the possibility of excellent control of winter annuol weeds, according to Antelope Valley tests, with no damage to the crop when properly applied. Clean alfalfa resulting from treatment returned $12 to $15 per ton more than weed-infested hay (including cost of treatment), and was also ready for a quick sale.
Diuron offers alfalfa growers the possibility of excellent control of winter annuol weeds, according to Antelope Valley tests, with no damage to the crop when properly applied. Clean alfalfa resulting from treatment returned $12 to $15 per ton more than weed-infested hay (including cost of treatment), and was also ready for a quick sale.
Research with parasites for biological control of house flies in southern California
by E. F. Legner, E. C. Bay, H. W. Brydon, C. W. McCoy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The introduction of new exotic species of larval and pupal parasites (probably from the Eastern Hemisphere) and the artificial distribution of existing parasites appear to offer the most immediate means for a more successful biological control effort in southern California, especially against Musca domestica, the most common of the house flies. Existing parasites are, how-ever, not as effective against this species as they are against Fannia and certain other species.
The introduction of new exotic species of larval and pupal parasites (probably from the Eastern Hemisphere) and the artificial distribution of existing parasites appear to offer the most immediate means for a more successful biological control effort in southern California, especially against Musca domestica, the most common of the house flies. Existing parasites are, how-ever, not as effective against this species as they are against Fannia and certain other species.
Water penetration in strawberries aided by seeding grain in furrows
by N. C. Welch, A. W. Marsh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Planting grain in furrows of strawberry fields counteracted compaction and increased water penetration in Riverside County tests. Adequate irrigation of the strawberries was maintained—along with frequent picking schedules—without holding water in the furrows for extended periods of time.
Planting grain in furrows of strawberry fields counteracted compaction and increased water penetration in Riverside County tests. Adequate irrigation of the strawberries was maintained—along with frequent picking schedules—without holding water in the furrows for extended periods of time.
Crossbred rams outlive purebred Suffolks and Hampshires in Glenn County Testing Program
by Monte Bell, G. E. Bradford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Crossbred yearling rams lived 20% longer according to experiments in western Glenn County than did their purebred Hampshire and Suffolk half-brothers. Mortality of all the yearling rams was high; 82% died before the fifth breeding season.
Crossbred yearling rams lived 20% longer according to experiments in western Glenn County than did their purebred Hampshire and Suffolk half-brothers. Mortality of all the yearling rams was high; 82% died before the fifth breeding season.

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