California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

December 1947
Volume 1, Number 13

Research articles

Califorina prune industry may face market adjustment
by S. W. Shear, George B. Alcorn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the next few years the California prune industry will probably go through a period of difficult adjustment largely because of the poor and uncertain foreign market outlook. Demand for California dried prunes will have to be increased or bearing acreage and average production decreased before prices can be expected that, without government support, will encourage efficient growers to maintain most of the good prune orchards in the state. During the next few years prices and overall demand for California dried prunes will probably continue to be held down: 1. At home, by keen competition from very plentiful supplies of fruits and popular fruit products; 2. Abroad, by considerably lower commercial demand and imports for our prunes than prevailed before the war, particularly in European markets.
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the next few years the California prune industry will probably go through a period of difficult adjustment largely because of the poor and uncertain foreign market outlook. Demand for California dried prunes will have to be increased or bearing acreage and average production decreased before prices can be expected that, without government support, will encourage efficient growers to maintain most of the good prune orchards in the state. During the next few years prices and overall demand for California dried prunes will probably continue to be held down: 1. At home, by keen competition from very plentiful supplies of fruits and popular fruit products; 2. Abroad, by considerably lower commercial demand and imports for our prunes than prevailed before the war, particularly in European markets.
Research on granulation of valencia oranges shows only limited control measures exist
by E. T. Bartholomew, W. B. Sinclair, F. M. Turrell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Granulation of Valencia oranges is not caused by a fungus, a virus, or a bacterium. It is definitely related to the growth activity of the tree and fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Granulation of Valencia oranges is not caused by a fungus, a virus, or a bacterium. It is definitely related to the growth activity of the tree and fruit.
Poultrymen may have more market competition ahead
by E. C. Voorhies
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: We must ship in eggs from other states. This puts the local producer in a favorable position because he gets a better price, and the consumer gets better eggs. The top quality ones are no longer shipped to eastern markets. Our in-shipments, on the other hand, do not come only from the Western states, as formerly, but in increasing numbers from those farther east, mainly the Mississippi Valley.
Not available – first paragraph follows: We must ship in eggs from other states. This puts the local producer in a favorable position because he gets a better price, and the consumer gets better eggs. The top quality ones are no longer shipped to eastern markets. Our in-shipments, on the other hand, do not come only from the Western states, as formerly, but in increasing numbers from those farther east, mainly the Mississippi Valley.
Ladybirds, lacewings, parasites tested as long-tailed mealybug controls in California citrus
by Paul DeBach, C. A. Fleschner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The long-tailed mealybug, Pseudo-coccus longispinus, is a relatively recent pest of citrus and occurs principally in coastal areas of Orange, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The long-tailed mealybug, Pseudo-coccus longispinus, is a relatively recent pest of citrus and occurs principally in coastal areas of Orange, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties.
Farm income reflected by farm real estate values—surveys indicate suitable use of soils
by Sidney Hoos, R. Earl Storie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following extracts are from addresses before the Annual Convention of the National Association of Real Estate Boards, San-Francisco. November ir, 1947.
The following extracts are from addresses before the Annual Convention of the National Association of Real Estate Boards, San-Francisco. November ir, 1947.
Value of poultry improvement plans to producers and buyers of chicks, poults, eggs defined
by A. S. Rosenwald
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: “Caveat emptor, let the buyer beware,” is an old adage which no longer need challenge poultrymen buying chicks, poults, or hatching eggs.
Not available – first paragraph follows: “Caveat emptor, let the buyer beware,” is an old adage which no longer need challenge poultrymen buying chicks, poults, or hatching eggs.
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http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=1_13

December 1947
Volume 1, Number 13

Research articles

Califorina prune industry may face market adjustment
by S. W. Shear, George B. Alcorn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the next few years the California prune industry will probably go through a period of difficult adjustment largely because of the poor and uncertain foreign market outlook. Demand for California dried prunes will have to be increased or bearing acreage and average production decreased before prices can be expected that, without government support, will encourage efficient growers to maintain most of the good prune orchards in the state. During the next few years prices and overall demand for California dried prunes will probably continue to be held down: 1. At home, by keen competition from very plentiful supplies of fruits and popular fruit products; 2. Abroad, by considerably lower commercial demand and imports for our prunes than prevailed before the war, particularly in European markets.
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the next few years the California prune industry will probably go through a period of difficult adjustment largely because of the poor and uncertain foreign market outlook. Demand for California dried prunes will have to be increased or bearing acreage and average production decreased before prices can be expected that, without government support, will encourage efficient growers to maintain most of the good prune orchards in the state. During the next few years prices and overall demand for California dried prunes will probably continue to be held down: 1. At home, by keen competition from very plentiful supplies of fruits and popular fruit products; 2. Abroad, by considerably lower commercial demand and imports for our prunes than prevailed before the war, particularly in European markets.
Research on granulation of valencia oranges shows only limited control measures exist
by E. T. Bartholomew, W. B. Sinclair, F. M. Turrell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Granulation of Valencia oranges is not caused by a fungus, a virus, or a bacterium. It is definitely related to the growth activity of the tree and fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Granulation of Valencia oranges is not caused by a fungus, a virus, or a bacterium. It is definitely related to the growth activity of the tree and fruit.
Poultrymen may have more market competition ahead
by E. C. Voorhies
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: We must ship in eggs from other states. This puts the local producer in a favorable position because he gets a better price, and the consumer gets better eggs. The top quality ones are no longer shipped to eastern markets. Our in-shipments, on the other hand, do not come only from the Western states, as formerly, but in increasing numbers from those farther east, mainly the Mississippi Valley.
Not available – first paragraph follows: We must ship in eggs from other states. This puts the local producer in a favorable position because he gets a better price, and the consumer gets better eggs. The top quality ones are no longer shipped to eastern markets. Our in-shipments, on the other hand, do not come only from the Western states, as formerly, but in increasing numbers from those farther east, mainly the Mississippi Valley.
Ladybirds, lacewings, parasites tested as long-tailed mealybug controls in California citrus
by Paul DeBach, C. A. Fleschner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The long-tailed mealybug, Pseudo-coccus longispinus, is a relatively recent pest of citrus and occurs principally in coastal areas of Orange, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The long-tailed mealybug, Pseudo-coccus longispinus, is a relatively recent pest of citrus and occurs principally in coastal areas of Orange, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties.
Farm income reflected by farm real estate values—surveys indicate suitable use of soils
by Sidney Hoos, R. Earl Storie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following extracts are from addresses before the Annual Convention of the National Association of Real Estate Boards, San-Francisco. November ir, 1947.
The following extracts are from addresses before the Annual Convention of the National Association of Real Estate Boards, San-Francisco. November ir, 1947.
Value of poultry improvement plans to producers and buyers of chicks, poults, eggs defined
by A. S. Rosenwald
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: “Caveat emptor, let the buyer beware,” is an old adage which no longer need challenge poultrymen buying chicks, poults, or hatching eggs.
Not available – first paragraph follows: “Caveat emptor, let the buyer beware,” is an old adage which no longer need challenge poultrymen buying chicks, poults, or hatching eggs.

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