California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 19, No.5

Research on systemics for integrated pest control program in cotton involves workers in the field, greenhouse, laboratory, and office.
May 1965
Volume 19, Number 5

Research articles

Irrigation for Nursery Container Plants: Tensiometers, automatic timing for sprinkler control
by F. K. Aljibury, W. M. Tomlinson, C. E. Houston
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Irrigation for nursery container plants…: Plastic Tube Irrigators with Electric Control
by N. W. Stice, L. J. Booher
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Frequent Irrigation Detrimental For Mechanically–Harvested: Tomatoes
by J. C. Lingle, R. M. Hagan, W. J. Flocker, P. E. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: frequent irrigation, the usual man- agement practice in the production of hand-picked tomatoes, is not necessarily best suited for the new varieties developed for one-time mechanical harvesting. In addition to the need for determinate maturity, dry fields allow much more efficient operation of mechanical harvesting equipment. These studies were conducted to determine how dry the soil can become before affecting yield, maturity, and soluble solids content of the new varieties-and whether a plant or soil moisture index can be developed as a guide to irrigation of the growing crop, as well as the final water cutoff date. Research has previously shown that irrigation practices do affect the relative maturity of the crop and can directly influence yields obtained in a single harvesting operation.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: frequent irrigation, the usual man- agement practice in the production of hand-picked tomatoes, is not necessarily best suited for the new varieties developed for one-time mechanical harvesting. In addition to the need for determinate maturity, dry fields allow much more efficient operation of mechanical harvesting equipment. These studies were conducted to determine how dry the soil can become before affecting yield, maturity, and soluble solids content of the new varieties-and whether a plant or soil moisture index can be developed as a guide to irrigation of the growing crop, as well as the final water cutoff date. Research has previously shown that irrigation practices do affect the relative maturity of the crop and can directly influence yields obtained in a single harvesting operation.
Systemic Insecticides Play Major Role in Research for: Integrated Pest Control in Cotton
by H. T. Reynolds, R. L. Metcalf, T. R. Fukuto
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: literally hundreds of chemicals have been evaluated for possible use as systemic insecticides in an extension research program aimed at integrated pest control for cotton. This research-sponsored and financed largely by the Cotton Producer's Institute-promises to reduce insect-caused crop losses and extra production costs for cotton estimated at nearly $300 million annually in the United States.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: literally hundreds of chemicals have been evaluated for possible use as systemic insecticides in an extension research program aimed at integrated pest control for cotton. This research-sponsored and financed largely by the Cotton Producer's Institute-promises to reduce insect-caused crop losses and extra production costs for cotton estimated at nearly $300 million annually in the United States.
Overhead Irrigation Encourages Wet-Weather Plant Diseases
by W. C. Snyder, R. G. Grogan, R. Bardin, M. N. Schroth
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vertical Mulching for Improvement of Old Golf Greens: …A further evaluation
by T. G. Byrne, W. B. Davis, L. J. Booher, L. F. Werenfels
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Pasture and greenchop performance comparisons…: Piper Sudangrass and Sudan Hybrids Under Irrigation
by D. C. Sumner, V. L. Marble, E. J. Gregory
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 19, No.5

Research on systemics for integrated pest control program in cotton involves workers in the field, greenhouse, laboratory, and office.
May 1965
Volume 19, Number 5

Research articles

Irrigation for Nursery Container Plants: Tensiometers, automatic timing for sprinkler control
by F. K. Aljibury, W. M. Tomlinson, C. E. Houston
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Irrigation for nursery container plants…: Plastic Tube Irrigators with Electric Control
by N. W. Stice, L. J. Booher
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Frequent Irrigation Detrimental For Mechanically–Harvested: Tomatoes
by J. C. Lingle, R. M. Hagan, W. J. Flocker, P. E. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: frequent irrigation, the usual man- agement practice in the production of hand-picked tomatoes, is not necessarily best suited for the new varieties developed for one-time mechanical harvesting. In addition to the need for determinate maturity, dry fields allow much more efficient operation of mechanical harvesting equipment. These studies were conducted to determine how dry the soil can become before affecting yield, maturity, and soluble solids content of the new varieties-and whether a plant or soil moisture index can be developed as a guide to irrigation of the growing crop, as well as the final water cutoff date. Research has previously shown that irrigation practices do affect the relative maturity of the crop and can directly influence yields obtained in a single harvesting operation.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: frequent irrigation, the usual man- agement practice in the production of hand-picked tomatoes, is not necessarily best suited for the new varieties developed for one-time mechanical harvesting. In addition to the need for determinate maturity, dry fields allow much more efficient operation of mechanical harvesting equipment. These studies were conducted to determine how dry the soil can become before affecting yield, maturity, and soluble solids content of the new varieties-and whether a plant or soil moisture index can be developed as a guide to irrigation of the growing crop, as well as the final water cutoff date. Research has previously shown that irrigation practices do affect the relative maturity of the crop and can directly influence yields obtained in a single harvesting operation.
Systemic Insecticides Play Major Role in Research for: Integrated Pest Control in Cotton
by H. T. Reynolds, R. L. Metcalf, T. R. Fukuto
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: literally hundreds of chemicals have been evaluated for possible use as systemic insecticides in an extension research program aimed at integrated pest control for cotton. This research-sponsored and financed largely by the Cotton Producer's Institute-promises to reduce insect-caused crop losses and extra production costs for cotton estimated at nearly $300 million annually in the United States.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: literally hundreds of chemicals have been evaluated for possible use as systemic insecticides in an extension research program aimed at integrated pest control for cotton. This research-sponsored and financed largely by the Cotton Producer's Institute-promises to reduce insect-caused crop losses and extra production costs for cotton estimated at nearly $300 million annually in the United States.
Overhead Irrigation Encourages Wet-Weather Plant Diseases
by W. C. Snyder, R. G. Grogan, R. Bardin, M. N. Schroth
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vertical Mulching for Improvement of Old Golf Greens: …A further evaluation
by T. G. Byrne, W. B. Davis, L. J. Booher, L. F. Werenfels
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Pasture and greenchop performance comparisons…: Piper Sudangrass and Sudan Hybrids Under Irrigation
by D. C. Sumner, V. L. Marble, E. J. Gregory
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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