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California Agriculture, Vol. 19, No.2

Fly Control for Poultry
February 1965
Volume 19, Number 2

Research articles

New chemicals show promise…: Weed control in transplanted celery
by A. H. Lange, R. A. Brendler, J. M. Lyons
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two new herbicides—prometryne and FW 925 (neither is registered for use on celery, so cannot be recommended)—have shown promise for weed control in transplanted celery, according to these preliminary tests in Ventura County.
Nutritive Value of Algae for Swine
by H. F. Hintz, H. Heitman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When added to barley in a ration, algae provided the same protein quality as meat and bone meal for growing or fattening pigs, according to tests conducted at Davis.
Row Width Effects on Pasture Yields of Irrigated Sudangrass and Hybrid Cultivars
by D. C. Sumner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
establishinc an annual irrigated pasture costs about the same as one based on perennial species. Therefore, every management opportunity should be taken to obtain maximum economical yields from the annual type, commensurate with the feed quality desired. One factor often overlooked by annual summer pasture operators that can favorably influence yield, is row spacing. It has been demonstrated many times that sudangrass stands are more productive when drilled than when broadcast. From experiments conducted under nonirrigated conditions in Illinois, it was determined that there was no significant difference in dry matter production of Piper sudangrass from row widths of 4, 8, and 16 inches. These trials were not harvested in the vegetative stage of growth as pasture but in the early bloom stage, nearing maturity.
establishinc an annual irrigated pasture costs about the same as one based on perennial species. Therefore, every management opportunity should be taken to obtain maximum economical yields from the annual type, commensurate with the feed quality desired. One factor often overlooked by annual summer pasture operators that can favorably influence yield, is row spacing. It has been demonstrated many times that sudangrass stands are more productive when drilled than when broadcast. From experiments conducted under nonirrigated conditions in Illinois, it was determined that there was no significant difference in dry matter production of Piper sudangrass from row widths of 4, 8, and 16 inches. These trials were not harvested in the vegetative stage of growth as pasture but in the early bloom stage, nearing maturity.
Predaceous Mite Controls Two-Spotted Spider Mite on Strawberry
by Earl R. Oatman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, Koch, on strawberry was obtained with mass releases of the predaceous mite Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot, during preliminary studies in the coastal area of southern California in 1964.
Diazinon Dust: For fly control in poultry manure
by D. D. Bell, W. R. Bowen, A. S. Deal, E. C. Loomis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tests conducted over a three-year period show that a dust made from Diazinon 50% wettable powder and agricultural gypsum will successfully kill domestic flies on poultry ranches. Best results were obtained when the dust was applied at weekly intervals to droppings beneath the poultry cages of commercial layer houses. These treatments gave good control of the little house fly (Fannia canicularis) and the false stable fly (Muscina stabulans), but failed to control the house fly (Musca domestica).
A progress report…: Citrus rootstocks resistant to phytophthora root rot
by L. J. Klotz, W. P. Bitters, T. A. DeWolfe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
valencia oranges observed on trifoliate rootstocks in this experiment at the Citrus Research Center, Riverside, and Valencia and navel trees in commercial orchards have performed well on this stock for many years; similarly, standard Lisbon lemon varieties have done well on trifoliate rootstock for the 13 years they have been observed. However, a high incidence of the exocortis virus in budwood of Eureka lemon and creasing of the bud union preclude its use on trifoliates or citranges.
valencia oranges observed on trifoliate rootstocks in this experiment at the Citrus Research Center, Riverside, and Valencia and navel trees in commercial orchards have performed well on this stock for many years; similarly, standard Lisbon lemon varieties have done well on trifoliate rootstock for the 13 years they have been observed. However, a high incidence of the exocortis virus in budwood of Eureka lemon and creasing of the bud union preclude its use on trifoliates or citranges.
Biological Control of Olive Scale
by C. E. Kennet, C. B. Huffaker, K. W. Opitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
For nearly thirty years, olive scale, Parlatoria oleae (Colvée), has been the most important insect pest of olives in California. Prior to the introduction of the Persian wasp, Aphytis maculicornis (Masi), in 1952, olive scale was also a most serious pest on deciduous fruits and many species of ornamentals in the Central Valley area. Since then, establishment of the Persian wasp, as well as one other parasite, Coccophagoides sp., has drastically reduced the severity and frequency of scale infestations in California, as reported in this study.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 19, No.2

Fly Control for Poultry
February 1965
Volume 19, Number 2

Research articles

New chemicals show promise…: Weed control in transplanted celery
by A. H. Lange, R. A. Brendler, J. M. Lyons
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two new herbicides—prometryne and FW 925 (neither is registered for use on celery, so cannot be recommended)—have shown promise for weed control in transplanted celery, according to these preliminary tests in Ventura County.
Nutritive Value of Algae for Swine
by H. F. Hintz, H. Heitman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
When added to barley in a ration, algae provided the same protein quality as meat and bone meal for growing or fattening pigs, according to tests conducted at Davis.
Row Width Effects on Pasture Yields of Irrigated Sudangrass and Hybrid Cultivars
by D. C. Sumner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
establishinc an annual irrigated pasture costs about the same as one based on perennial species. Therefore, every management opportunity should be taken to obtain maximum economical yields from the annual type, commensurate with the feed quality desired. One factor often overlooked by annual summer pasture operators that can favorably influence yield, is row spacing. It has been demonstrated many times that sudangrass stands are more productive when drilled than when broadcast. From experiments conducted under nonirrigated conditions in Illinois, it was determined that there was no significant difference in dry matter production of Piper sudangrass from row widths of 4, 8, and 16 inches. These trials were not harvested in the vegetative stage of growth as pasture but in the early bloom stage, nearing maturity.
establishinc an annual irrigated pasture costs about the same as one based on perennial species. Therefore, every management opportunity should be taken to obtain maximum economical yields from the annual type, commensurate with the feed quality desired. One factor often overlooked by annual summer pasture operators that can favorably influence yield, is row spacing. It has been demonstrated many times that sudangrass stands are more productive when drilled than when broadcast. From experiments conducted under nonirrigated conditions in Illinois, it was determined that there was no significant difference in dry matter production of Piper sudangrass from row widths of 4, 8, and 16 inches. These trials were not harvested in the vegetative stage of growth as pasture but in the early bloom stage, nearing maturity.
Predaceous Mite Controls Two-Spotted Spider Mite on Strawberry
by Earl R. Oatman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, Koch, on strawberry was obtained with mass releases of the predaceous mite Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot, during preliminary studies in the coastal area of southern California in 1964.
Diazinon Dust: For fly control in poultry manure
by D. D. Bell, W. R. Bowen, A. S. Deal, E. C. Loomis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tests conducted over a three-year period show that a dust made from Diazinon 50% wettable powder and agricultural gypsum will successfully kill domestic flies on poultry ranches. Best results were obtained when the dust was applied at weekly intervals to droppings beneath the poultry cages of commercial layer houses. These treatments gave good control of the little house fly (Fannia canicularis) and the false stable fly (Muscina stabulans), but failed to control the house fly (Musca domestica).
A progress report…: Citrus rootstocks resistant to phytophthora root rot
by L. J. Klotz, W. P. Bitters, T. A. DeWolfe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
valencia oranges observed on trifoliate rootstocks in this experiment at the Citrus Research Center, Riverside, and Valencia and navel trees in commercial orchards have performed well on this stock for many years; similarly, standard Lisbon lemon varieties have done well on trifoliate rootstock for the 13 years they have been observed. However, a high incidence of the exocortis virus in budwood of Eureka lemon and creasing of the bud union preclude its use on trifoliates or citranges.
valencia oranges observed on trifoliate rootstocks in this experiment at the Citrus Research Center, Riverside, and Valencia and navel trees in commercial orchards have performed well on this stock for many years; similarly, standard Lisbon lemon varieties have done well on trifoliate rootstock for the 13 years they have been observed. However, a high incidence of the exocortis virus in budwood of Eureka lemon and creasing of the bud union preclude its use on trifoliates or citranges.
Biological Control of Olive Scale
by C. E. Kennet, C. B. Huffaker, K. W. Opitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
For nearly thirty years, olive scale, Parlatoria oleae (Colvée), has been the most important insect pest of olives in California. Prior to the introduction of the Persian wasp, Aphytis maculicornis (Masi), in 1952, olive scale was also a most serious pest on deciduous fruits and many species of ornamentals in the Central Valley area. Since then, establishment of the Persian wasp, as well as one other parasite, Coccophagoides sp., has drastically reduced the severity and frequency of scale infestations in California, as reported in this study.

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