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California Agriculture, Vol. 15, No.5

Relationship between trees and cattle in ponderosa
May 1961
Volume 15, Number 5

Research articles

Range fertilization of annual forage plants aids plant use of available soil moisture
by Cyrus M. McKell, Jack Major, Eugene R. Perrier
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seed germination and early plant growth of most annual forage species on approximately 18 million acres of California's rangeland take place soon after the first fall rains, but the greatest growth is in late winter and spring when temperatures and soil moisture supplies are favorable.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seed germination and early plant growth of most annual forage species on approximately 18 million acres of California's rangeland take place soon after the first fall rains, but the greatest growth is in late winter and spring when temperatures and soil moisture supplies are favorable.
California mastitis test for dairy herd improvement
by O. W. Schalm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 30,000 cows in- California are being screened every month by the California Mastitis Test—CMT—applied to milk samples collected for butterfat determination. Owners of dairy herds which show a high level of CMT-positive cows are receiving advice on management. Where indicated, medical treatment is given during the 2-3 months when the milk producing glands are in the resting or dry state.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 30,000 cows in- California are being screened every month by the California Mastitis Test—CMT—applied to milk samples collected for butterfat determination. Owners of dairy herds which show a high level of CMT-positive cows are receiving advice on management. Where indicated, medical treatment is given during the 2-3 months when the milk producing glands are in the resting or dry state.
Laboratory and field trials with sorptive dusts and dibrom for control of animal and household pests
by I. Barry Tarshis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dibrom—1, 2-dibromo-2, 2-dichloro-ethyl dimethyl phosphate—a comparatively new organic phosphate insecticide, can be combined with the sorptive dust Dri-Die 67 to hasten its knockdown action.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dibrom—1, 2-dibromo-2, 2-dichloro-ethyl dimethyl phosphate—a comparatively new organic phosphate insecticide, can be combined with the sorptive dust Dri-Die 67 to hasten its knockdown action.
Size and growth habits of trifoliate orange selections
by L. M. Shannon, E. F. Frolich, S. H. Cameron
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Among the characteristics of trifoliate orange—Poncirus trifoliala—rootstock for citrus is its supposed dwarfing effect on tree size. However, many of the Valencia, Washington Navel, and grapefruit trees budded on trifoliate orange rootstock are large and productive. Frequently, the trees that exhibit varying degrees of dwarfness are immediately adjacent to large trees.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Among the characteristics of trifoliate orange—Poncirus trifoliala—rootstock for citrus is its supposed dwarfing effect on tree size. However, many of the Valencia, Washington Navel, and grapefruit trees budded on trifoliate orange rootstock are large and productive. Frequently, the trees that exhibit varying degrees of dwarfness are immediately adjacent to large trees.
Relationship between trees and cattle in ponderosa pine
by Rex D. Pieper, H. H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Multiple-use management of wildlands becomes increasingly important as population pressure rises in California. Certain areas are capable of producing several products for maximum returns. In some cases several uses are compatible on the same area, while in others conflicts develop. Before any cultural practices are widely applied on areas which have a potential for multiple-use management, the effects of such practices must be studied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Multiple-use management of wildlands becomes increasingly important as population pressure rises in California. Certain areas are capable of producing several products for maximum returns. In some cases several uses are compatible on the same area, while in others conflicts develop. Before any cultural practices are widely applied on areas which have a potential for multiple-use management, the effects of such practices must be studied.
Control tests for tomato insects
by A. E. Michelbacher, John P. Underhill
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chemical control of tomato caterpillars and of tomato leafminer was studied in fields near Tracy.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chemical control of tomato caterpillars and of tomato leafminer was studied in fields near Tracy.
A modified nitric acid process for wood pulping
by David L. Brink
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: California's wood processing operations provide sufficient residuals to supply a number of pulping plants with adequate raw material. At present, a large percentage of this raw material must be destroyed in order to dispose of it. This results in waste of huge quantities of potential pulpwood. A major problem in utilizing the residuals in conventional pulping processes, as is done extensively in other states, has concerned the use of water. In pulping, effluents are produced which contain solids. These solids may be only a fraction of the total pulping chemical and wood going into the process but, based on the large tonnage produced, the material does introduce certain problems with respect to its disposal in a receiving water. Process designs are available which tend to minimize or even eliminate these problems, but the steps involved are generally expensive and non-productive.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California's wood processing operations provide sufficient residuals to supply a number of pulping plants with adequate raw material. At present, a large percentage of this raw material must be destroyed in order to dispose of it. This results in waste of huge quantities of potential pulpwood. A major problem in utilizing the residuals in conventional pulping processes, as is done extensively in other states, has concerned the use of water. In pulping, effluents are produced which contain solids. These solids may be only a fraction of the total pulping chemical and wood going into the process but, based on the large tonnage produced, the material does introduce certain problems with respect to its disposal in a receiving water. Process designs are available which tend to minimize or even eliminate these problems, but the steps involved are generally expensive and non-productive.

General Information

Hay harvesting by self-propelled swather compared with mowing and raking
by R. A. Kepner, J. R. Goss, L. G. Jones
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 15, No.5

Relationship between trees and cattle in ponderosa
May 1961
Volume 15, Number 5

Research articles

Range fertilization of annual forage plants aids plant use of available soil moisture
by Cyrus M. McKell, Jack Major, Eugene R. Perrier
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seed germination and early plant growth of most annual forage species on approximately 18 million acres of California's rangeland take place soon after the first fall rains, but the greatest growth is in late winter and spring when temperatures and soil moisture supplies are favorable.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Seed germination and early plant growth of most annual forage species on approximately 18 million acres of California's rangeland take place soon after the first fall rains, but the greatest growth is in late winter and spring when temperatures and soil moisture supplies are favorable.
California mastitis test for dairy herd improvement
by O. W. Schalm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 30,000 cows in- California are being screened every month by the California Mastitis Test—CMT—applied to milk samples collected for butterfat determination. Owners of dairy herds which show a high level of CMT-positive cows are receiving advice on management. Where indicated, medical treatment is given during the 2-3 months when the milk producing glands are in the resting or dry state.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 30,000 cows in- California are being screened every month by the California Mastitis Test—CMT—applied to milk samples collected for butterfat determination. Owners of dairy herds which show a high level of CMT-positive cows are receiving advice on management. Where indicated, medical treatment is given during the 2-3 months when the milk producing glands are in the resting or dry state.
Laboratory and field trials with sorptive dusts and dibrom for control of animal and household pests
by I. Barry Tarshis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dibrom—1, 2-dibromo-2, 2-dichloro-ethyl dimethyl phosphate—a comparatively new organic phosphate insecticide, can be combined with the sorptive dust Dri-Die 67 to hasten its knockdown action.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dibrom—1, 2-dibromo-2, 2-dichloro-ethyl dimethyl phosphate—a comparatively new organic phosphate insecticide, can be combined with the sorptive dust Dri-Die 67 to hasten its knockdown action.
Size and growth habits of trifoliate orange selections
by L. M. Shannon, E. F. Frolich, S. H. Cameron
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Among the characteristics of trifoliate orange—Poncirus trifoliala—rootstock for citrus is its supposed dwarfing effect on tree size. However, many of the Valencia, Washington Navel, and grapefruit trees budded on trifoliate orange rootstock are large and productive. Frequently, the trees that exhibit varying degrees of dwarfness are immediately adjacent to large trees.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Among the characteristics of trifoliate orange—Poncirus trifoliala—rootstock for citrus is its supposed dwarfing effect on tree size. However, many of the Valencia, Washington Navel, and grapefruit trees budded on trifoliate orange rootstock are large and productive. Frequently, the trees that exhibit varying degrees of dwarfness are immediately adjacent to large trees.
Relationship between trees and cattle in ponderosa pine
by Rex D. Pieper, H. H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Multiple-use management of wildlands becomes increasingly important as population pressure rises in California. Certain areas are capable of producing several products for maximum returns. In some cases several uses are compatible on the same area, while in others conflicts develop. Before any cultural practices are widely applied on areas which have a potential for multiple-use management, the effects of such practices must be studied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Multiple-use management of wildlands becomes increasingly important as population pressure rises in California. Certain areas are capable of producing several products for maximum returns. In some cases several uses are compatible on the same area, while in others conflicts develop. Before any cultural practices are widely applied on areas which have a potential for multiple-use management, the effects of such practices must be studied.
Control tests for tomato insects
by A. E. Michelbacher, John P. Underhill
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chemical control of tomato caterpillars and of tomato leafminer was studied in fields near Tracy.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chemical control of tomato caterpillars and of tomato leafminer was studied in fields near Tracy.
A modified nitric acid process for wood pulping
by David L. Brink
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: California's wood processing operations provide sufficient residuals to supply a number of pulping plants with adequate raw material. At present, a large percentage of this raw material must be destroyed in order to dispose of it. This results in waste of huge quantities of potential pulpwood. A major problem in utilizing the residuals in conventional pulping processes, as is done extensively in other states, has concerned the use of water. In pulping, effluents are produced which contain solids. These solids may be only a fraction of the total pulping chemical and wood going into the process but, based on the large tonnage produced, the material does introduce certain problems with respect to its disposal in a receiving water. Process designs are available which tend to minimize or even eliminate these problems, but the steps involved are generally expensive and non-productive.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California's wood processing operations provide sufficient residuals to supply a number of pulping plants with adequate raw material. At present, a large percentage of this raw material must be destroyed in order to dispose of it. This results in waste of huge quantities of potential pulpwood. A major problem in utilizing the residuals in conventional pulping processes, as is done extensively in other states, has concerned the use of water. In pulping, effluents are produced which contain solids. These solids may be only a fraction of the total pulping chemical and wood going into the process but, based on the large tonnage produced, the material does introduce certain problems with respect to its disposal in a receiving water. Process designs are available which tend to minimize or even eliminate these problems, but the steps involved are generally expensive and non-productive.

General Information

Hay harvesting by self-propelled swather compared with mowing and raking
by R. A. Kepner, J. R. Goss, L. G. Jones
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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