California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 13, No.8

Under-tree wind machine tested in peaches
August 1959
Volume 13, Number 8

Research articles

Frost protection in peaches: New model under-tree wind machine tested with and without burners in orchard near Wheatland during winter of 1958–59
by Todd V. Crawford, F. A. Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tower mounted wind machines raise orchard temperatures largely by the forced mixing of cold orchard air with the warmer air overhead. However, tests in an almond orchard in the Chico area –in 1955 and 1957–showed that the air jet from tower mounted machines had difficulty in penetrating the tree canopy –typical of deciduous orchards–formed by the intertwining of branches of adjacent trees. Underneath the tree canopy deciduous orchards are relatively open but growers report that most frost damage occurs in the lower part of the trees.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tower mounted wind machines raise orchard temperatures largely by the forced mixing of cold orchard air with the warmer air overhead. However, tests in an almond orchard in the Chico area –in 1955 and 1957–showed that the air jet from tower mounted machines had difficulty in penetrating the tree canopy –typical of deciduous orchards–formed by the intertwining of branches of adjacent trees. Underneath the tree canopy deciduous orchards are relatively open but growers report that most frost damage occurs in the lower part of the trees.
New winter rye: Productive winter annual cereal grain has high fertility in California tests
by Coit A. Suneson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The first California certified seed of Svälof Fourex spring rye–introduced from Sweden–is expected to become available for commercial use after the 1959 harvest.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The first California certified seed of Svälof Fourex spring rye–introduced from Sweden–is expected to become available for commercial use after the 1959 harvest.
High phosphorus for alfalfa: Plant analysis used to evaluate phosphorus status of alfalfa fields as guide to fertilizing for better yields and returns
by W. R. Sallee, Albert Ulrich, W. E. Martin, B. A. Krantz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Techniques of Field Sampling and Plant Analysis A field of alfalfa should be divided into two or more segments of not over 20 acres each. Sampling should be done at one-tenth bloom or when one out of 10 plants has some open blossoms. Samples should be taken by walking across the center of the area collecting one complete stem of alfalfa at 35 different locations distributed at equal intervals. The mid-stem tissue is obtained by cutting out the middle third of the stem and stripping the leaves from it. Samples should be air dried or oven dried at 158°F and ground to pass a 40-mesh screen. Analysis for acid soluble phosphorus is made as described on page 49 of California Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 766. A free copy of Bulletin 766 may be obtained at the local Farm Advisor's Office or by a request sent to Agricultural Publications, 207 University Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
Techniques of Field Sampling and Plant Analysis A field of alfalfa should be divided into two or more segments of not over 20 acres each. Sampling should be done at one-tenth bloom or when one out of 10 plants has some open blossoms. Samples should be taken by walking across the center of the area collecting one complete stem of alfalfa at 35 different locations distributed at equal intervals. The mid-stem tissue is obtained by cutting out the middle third of the stem and stripping the leaves from it. Samples should be air dried or oven dried at 158°F and ground to pass a 40-mesh screen. Analysis for acid soluble phosphorus is made as described on page 49 of California Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 766. A free copy of Bulletin 766 may be obtained at the local Farm Advisor's Office or by a request sent to Agricultural Publications, 207 University Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
Lime effect on soil properties: Studies made on the effect of massive lime applications on physical properties of five types of Sacramento Valley soils
by A. L. Brown, T. R. Nielsen, E. Halevy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: By-product lime–from beet sugar refineries–is used frequently in the Central Valley of California, to improve the physical condition of the soil, particularly for seedbed preparation. Lime is commonly applied to acid soils to decrease the acidity but the pH–relative acidity-alkalinity–of most of the Central Valley soils is neutral to slightly alkaline.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: By-product lime–from beet sugar refineries–is used frequently in the Central Valley of California, to improve the physical condition of the soil, particularly for seedbed preparation. Lime is commonly applied to acid soils to decrease the acidity but the pH–relative acidity-alkalinity–of most of the Central Valley soils is neutral to slightly alkaline.
Rice water weevil: Beetle pest in rice growing areas of southern states discovered in California
by W. H. Lange, A. A. Grigarick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Young rice plants damaged by the rice water weevil–Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel–were found in fields near Biggs on June 1, 1959.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Young rice plants damaged by the rice water weevil–Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel–were found in fields near Biggs on June 1, 1959.
Corn earworm in grain sorghum phosdrin and thiodan: Show promise as substitutes for DDT in two experiments with aerial applications to infested fields
by Oscar G. Bacon, Raymond Miskus, Morton D. Morse, Robert L. Sailsbery
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage to grain sorghum by the corn earworm–Heliothis zea (Boddie) –has been especially severe in Butte and Glenn counties. Certain fields examined in 1957 and 1958 showed 90%-99% of the heads to be infested. Usually 1–4 larvae per head were found although some heads had 10-16 larvae.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage to grain sorghum by the corn earworm–Heliothis zea (Boddie) –has been especially severe in Butte and Glenn counties. Certain fields examined in 1957 and 1958 showed 90%-99% of the heads to be infested. Usually 1–4 larvae per head were found although some heads had 10-16 larvae.
Strip-treatment with chemicals: Satisfactory commercial control achieved in orange orchard program designed to conserve natural enemies of citrus pests
by Paul DeBach, John Landi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Based on results of an eight-year study, a 12-month alternation strip-treatment seems to be a feasible control program throughout Orange County areas where purple scale–Lepidosaphes beckii (Newm.)–is the primary pest on oranges.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Based on results of an eight-year study, a 12-month alternation strip-treatment seems to be a feasible control program throughout Orange County areas where purple scale–Lepidosaphes beckii (Newm.)–is the primary pest on oranges.
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=13_8

California Agriculture, Vol. 13, No.8

Under-tree wind machine tested in peaches
August 1959
Volume 13, Number 8

Research articles

Frost protection in peaches: New model under-tree wind machine tested with and without burners in orchard near Wheatland during winter of 1958–59
by Todd V. Crawford, F. A. Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tower mounted wind machines raise orchard temperatures largely by the forced mixing of cold orchard air with the warmer air overhead. However, tests in an almond orchard in the Chico area –in 1955 and 1957–showed that the air jet from tower mounted machines had difficulty in penetrating the tree canopy –typical of deciduous orchards–formed by the intertwining of branches of adjacent trees. Underneath the tree canopy deciduous orchards are relatively open but growers report that most frost damage occurs in the lower part of the trees.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tower mounted wind machines raise orchard temperatures largely by the forced mixing of cold orchard air with the warmer air overhead. However, tests in an almond orchard in the Chico area –in 1955 and 1957–showed that the air jet from tower mounted machines had difficulty in penetrating the tree canopy –typical of deciduous orchards–formed by the intertwining of branches of adjacent trees. Underneath the tree canopy deciduous orchards are relatively open but growers report that most frost damage occurs in the lower part of the trees.
New winter rye: Productive winter annual cereal grain has high fertility in California tests
by Coit A. Suneson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The first California certified seed of Svälof Fourex spring rye–introduced from Sweden–is expected to become available for commercial use after the 1959 harvest.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The first California certified seed of Svälof Fourex spring rye–introduced from Sweden–is expected to become available for commercial use after the 1959 harvest.
High phosphorus for alfalfa: Plant analysis used to evaluate phosphorus status of alfalfa fields as guide to fertilizing for better yields and returns
by W. R. Sallee, Albert Ulrich, W. E. Martin, B. A. Krantz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Techniques of Field Sampling and Plant Analysis A field of alfalfa should be divided into two or more segments of not over 20 acres each. Sampling should be done at one-tenth bloom or when one out of 10 plants has some open blossoms. Samples should be taken by walking across the center of the area collecting one complete stem of alfalfa at 35 different locations distributed at equal intervals. The mid-stem tissue is obtained by cutting out the middle third of the stem and stripping the leaves from it. Samples should be air dried or oven dried at 158°F and ground to pass a 40-mesh screen. Analysis for acid soluble phosphorus is made as described on page 49 of California Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 766. A free copy of Bulletin 766 may be obtained at the local Farm Advisor's Office or by a request sent to Agricultural Publications, 207 University Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
Techniques of Field Sampling and Plant Analysis A field of alfalfa should be divided into two or more segments of not over 20 acres each. Sampling should be done at one-tenth bloom or when one out of 10 plants has some open blossoms. Samples should be taken by walking across the center of the area collecting one complete stem of alfalfa at 35 different locations distributed at equal intervals. The mid-stem tissue is obtained by cutting out the middle third of the stem and stripping the leaves from it. Samples should be air dried or oven dried at 158°F and ground to pass a 40-mesh screen. Analysis for acid soluble phosphorus is made as described on page 49 of California Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 766. A free copy of Bulletin 766 may be obtained at the local Farm Advisor's Office or by a request sent to Agricultural Publications, 207 University Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
Lime effect on soil properties: Studies made on the effect of massive lime applications on physical properties of five types of Sacramento Valley soils
by A. L. Brown, T. R. Nielsen, E. Halevy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: By-product lime–from beet sugar refineries–is used frequently in the Central Valley of California, to improve the physical condition of the soil, particularly for seedbed preparation. Lime is commonly applied to acid soils to decrease the acidity but the pH–relative acidity-alkalinity–of most of the Central Valley soils is neutral to slightly alkaline.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: By-product lime–from beet sugar refineries–is used frequently in the Central Valley of California, to improve the physical condition of the soil, particularly for seedbed preparation. Lime is commonly applied to acid soils to decrease the acidity but the pH–relative acidity-alkalinity–of most of the Central Valley soils is neutral to slightly alkaline.
Rice water weevil: Beetle pest in rice growing areas of southern states discovered in California
by W. H. Lange, A. A. Grigarick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Young rice plants damaged by the rice water weevil–Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel–were found in fields near Biggs on June 1, 1959.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Young rice plants damaged by the rice water weevil–Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel–were found in fields near Biggs on June 1, 1959.
Corn earworm in grain sorghum phosdrin and thiodan: Show promise as substitutes for DDT in two experiments with aerial applications to infested fields
by Oscar G. Bacon, Raymond Miskus, Morton D. Morse, Robert L. Sailsbery
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage to grain sorghum by the corn earworm–Heliothis zea (Boddie) –has been especially severe in Butte and Glenn counties. Certain fields examined in 1957 and 1958 showed 90%-99% of the heads to be infested. Usually 1–4 larvae per head were found although some heads had 10-16 larvae.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage to grain sorghum by the corn earworm–Heliothis zea (Boddie) –has been especially severe in Butte and Glenn counties. Certain fields examined in 1957 and 1958 showed 90%-99% of the heads to be infested. Usually 1–4 larvae per head were found although some heads had 10-16 larvae.
Strip-treatment with chemicals: Satisfactory commercial control achieved in orange orchard program designed to conserve natural enemies of citrus pests
by Paul DeBach, John Landi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Based on results of an eight-year study, a 12-month alternation strip-treatment seems to be a feasible control program throughout Orange County areas where purple scale–Lepidosaphes beckii (Newm.)–is the primary pest on oranges.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Based on results of an eight-year study, a 12-month alternation strip-treatment seems to be a feasible control program throughout Orange County areas where purple scale–Lepidosaphes beckii (Newm.)–is the primary pest on oranges.

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/