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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.9

New portable orchard fruit cooler
September 1956
Volume 10, Number 9

Research articles

Declining citrus root systems: Relationship of root systems to top growth and production investigated in citrus orchard rejuvenation program studies
by G. A. Cahoon, R. B. Harding, D. B. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The decline of citrus root systems is one of the more serious current problems in production and fruit size. During the past few years, quantitative information has been accumulating on the extent of citrus root decline and its relationship to growth and production.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The decline of citrus root systems is one of the more serious current problems in production and fruit size. During the past few years, quantitative information has been accumulating on the extent of citrus root decline and its relationship to growth and production.
Sodium in lemon tree collapse: Analyses show high sodium concentrations in the roots of collapsing trees are result of tree condition, not the cause
by D. R. Rodney, R. B. Harding, S. B. Boswell, F. L. Whiting
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: An answer to whether high concentrations of sodium found in roots of lemon trees severely affected by decline—collapse—were the cause or the result of the tree's condition was the objective of a series of analyses of root and soil samples.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An answer to whether high concentrations of sodium found in roots of lemon trees severely affected by decline—collapse—were the cause or the result of the tree's condition was the objective of a series of analyses of root and soil samples.
Nematode resistance in peaches: Resistance to two widespread species of root-knot nematode ranged from almost immunity to none in peach seedling study
by C. J. Hansen, B. F. Lownrbery, C. O. Hesse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two species of gall-forming root-knot nematodes—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica—seem to be the most widespread of several kinds that parasitize California peaches. Consequently, first efforts toward selection of nematode-resistant rootstocks have been directed against these nematodes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two species of gall-forming root-knot nematodes—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica—seem to be the most widespread of several kinds that parasitize California peaches. Consequently, first efforts toward selection of nematode-resistant rootstocks have been directed against these nematodes.
Calico scale on walnuts: Problem of soft scales on walnut increasing but natural enemies still exert suppressing influence on calico scale
by A. E. Michelbacher, Stephen Hitchcock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Audubon's warbler and a wasp parasite work together to hold the calico scale—potentially destructive on walnuts —under control. This occurs even under conditions where—because of the tendency of the newer insecticides to interfere with natural enemies—other un-armored scale population has increased.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Audubon's warbler and a wasp parasite work together to hold the calico scale—potentially destructive on walnuts —under control. This occurs even under conditions where—because of the tendency of the newer insecticides to interfere with natural enemies—other un-armored scale population has increased.
Fruit cooling by forced air: Portable unit designed to cool fruit in orchard at harvest reduces usually required 12-hour cooling period to 1 1/2 hours
by Rene Guillou, Ralph R. Parks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Refrigeration is necessary to extend the shelf-life of market fruits, and the sooner after harvest the better. Under current practice, it may take 12 to 36 hours for even the field heat to be removed from such table fruits as plums, apricots, peaches and grapes. However, orderly harvest and movement of the fruit to adequate refrigeration facilities will shorten the cooling time. Beyond the initial cooling, the shipper should supply adequate cold storage to insure the fruit being marketed in a fresh-appearing condition.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Refrigeration is necessary to extend the shelf-life of market fruits, and the sooner after harvest the better. Under current practice, it may take 12 to 36 hours for even the field heat to be removed from such table fruits as plums, apricots, peaches and grapes. However, orderly harvest and movement of the fruit to adequate refrigeration facilities will shorten the cooling time. Beyond the initial cooling, the shipper should supply adequate cold storage to insure the fruit being marketed in a fresh-appearing condition.
Control of powder-post beetles: Complete kills of Lyctus beetles infesting hardwood floors achieved in 5–10 minute applications of infrared radiation
by Roy J. Pence
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Exposure time required for the fast, efficient heat of infrared radiation to kill Lyctus powder-post beetles—in all stages of development—is governed by the thickness of the infested hardwood floor. Once the floor thickness has been determined and the exposure time known, 100% mortality of the Lyctus beetles can be expected under every square inch of area covered by a recently developed infrared unit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Exposure time required for the fast, efficient heat of infrared radiation to kill Lyctus powder-post beetles—in all stages of development—is governed by the thickness of the infested hardwood floor. Once the floor thickness has been determined and the exposure time known, 100% mortality of the Lyctus beetles can be expected under every square inch of area covered by a recently developed infrared unit.
Chlorine in plant nutrition: Experiments with plants in nutrient solutions establish chlorine as a micronutrient essential to plant growth
by Perry R. Stout, C. M. Johnson, T. C. Broyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A severe nutritional deficiency disease occurred in tomato plants growing in experimental cultures after chlorine was removed from the nutrient solutions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A severe nutritional deficiency disease occurred in tomato plants growing in experimental cultures after chlorine was removed from the nutrient solutions.
Gains of two types of lambs: Suffolk-Corriedale crosses gained faster and weighed more at weaning than Corriedale crosses during comparative study
by D. T. Torell, D. W. Cassard, W. C. Weir, J. F. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Suffolk-sired lambs from grade Corriedale ewes gained faster than Corriedale-sired lambs during a three-year study at the Hopland Field Station. Also, male lambs were heavier than females within their own breed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Suffolk-sired lambs from grade Corriedale ewes gained faster than Corriedale-sired lambs during a three-year study at the Hopland Field Station. Also, male lambs were heavier than females within their own breed.
Seedling growth on burned soil: Effect of prescribed burning on soil fertility reflected by the growth of pine seedlings in study of nutrient response
by J. Vlamis, H. H. Biswell, A. M. Schultr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ponderosa pine seedlings were used in a study of soil fertility changes induced by prescribed burning to learn whether nutrient responses would be reflected by a crop natural to the soil.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ponderosa pine seedlings were used in a study of soil fertility changes induced by prescribed burning to learn whether nutrient responses would be reflected by a crop natural to the soil.
Drought-tolerating ornamentals: Natives and introductions from like climates require little water or maintenance and are adaptable to rural landscape
by Robert B. Deering
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Drought-tolerating plants are useful for landscaping areas which do not normally receive irrigation water. They are especially adaptable to the rural home landscape because there is usually sufficient space for them to grow in areas which will not receive summer water. They can be valuable as windbreaks and screens for buildings and machinery.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Drought-tolerating plants are useful for landscaping areas which do not normally receive irrigation water. They are especially adaptable to the rural home landscape because there is usually sufficient space for them to grow in areas which will not receive summer water. They can be valuable as windbreaks and screens for buildings and machinery.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.9

New portable orchard fruit cooler
September 1956
Volume 10, Number 9

Research articles

Declining citrus root systems: Relationship of root systems to top growth and production investigated in citrus orchard rejuvenation program studies
by G. A. Cahoon, R. B. Harding, D. B. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The decline of citrus root systems is one of the more serious current problems in production and fruit size. During the past few years, quantitative information has been accumulating on the extent of citrus root decline and its relationship to growth and production.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The decline of citrus root systems is one of the more serious current problems in production and fruit size. During the past few years, quantitative information has been accumulating on the extent of citrus root decline and its relationship to growth and production.
Sodium in lemon tree collapse: Analyses show high sodium concentrations in the roots of collapsing trees are result of tree condition, not the cause
by D. R. Rodney, R. B. Harding, S. B. Boswell, F. L. Whiting
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: An answer to whether high concentrations of sodium found in roots of lemon trees severely affected by decline—collapse—were the cause or the result of the tree's condition was the objective of a series of analyses of root and soil samples.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An answer to whether high concentrations of sodium found in roots of lemon trees severely affected by decline—collapse—were the cause or the result of the tree's condition was the objective of a series of analyses of root and soil samples.
Nematode resistance in peaches: Resistance to two widespread species of root-knot nematode ranged from almost immunity to none in peach seedling study
by C. J. Hansen, B. F. Lownrbery, C. O. Hesse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two species of gall-forming root-knot nematodes—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica—seem to be the most widespread of several kinds that parasitize California peaches. Consequently, first efforts toward selection of nematode-resistant rootstocks have been directed against these nematodes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two species of gall-forming root-knot nematodes—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica—seem to be the most widespread of several kinds that parasitize California peaches. Consequently, first efforts toward selection of nematode-resistant rootstocks have been directed against these nematodes.
Calico scale on walnuts: Problem of soft scales on walnut increasing but natural enemies still exert suppressing influence on calico scale
by A. E. Michelbacher, Stephen Hitchcock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Audubon's warbler and a wasp parasite work together to hold the calico scale—potentially destructive on walnuts —under control. This occurs even under conditions where—because of the tendency of the newer insecticides to interfere with natural enemies—other un-armored scale population has increased.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Audubon's warbler and a wasp parasite work together to hold the calico scale—potentially destructive on walnuts —under control. This occurs even under conditions where—because of the tendency of the newer insecticides to interfere with natural enemies—other un-armored scale population has increased.
Fruit cooling by forced air: Portable unit designed to cool fruit in orchard at harvest reduces usually required 12-hour cooling period to 1 1/2 hours
by Rene Guillou, Ralph R. Parks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Refrigeration is necessary to extend the shelf-life of market fruits, and the sooner after harvest the better. Under current practice, it may take 12 to 36 hours for even the field heat to be removed from such table fruits as plums, apricots, peaches and grapes. However, orderly harvest and movement of the fruit to adequate refrigeration facilities will shorten the cooling time. Beyond the initial cooling, the shipper should supply adequate cold storage to insure the fruit being marketed in a fresh-appearing condition.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Refrigeration is necessary to extend the shelf-life of market fruits, and the sooner after harvest the better. Under current practice, it may take 12 to 36 hours for even the field heat to be removed from such table fruits as plums, apricots, peaches and grapes. However, orderly harvest and movement of the fruit to adequate refrigeration facilities will shorten the cooling time. Beyond the initial cooling, the shipper should supply adequate cold storage to insure the fruit being marketed in a fresh-appearing condition.
Control of powder-post beetles: Complete kills of Lyctus beetles infesting hardwood floors achieved in 5–10 minute applications of infrared radiation
by Roy J. Pence
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Exposure time required for the fast, efficient heat of infrared radiation to kill Lyctus powder-post beetles—in all stages of development—is governed by the thickness of the infested hardwood floor. Once the floor thickness has been determined and the exposure time known, 100% mortality of the Lyctus beetles can be expected under every square inch of area covered by a recently developed infrared unit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Exposure time required for the fast, efficient heat of infrared radiation to kill Lyctus powder-post beetles—in all stages of development—is governed by the thickness of the infested hardwood floor. Once the floor thickness has been determined and the exposure time known, 100% mortality of the Lyctus beetles can be expected under every square inch of area covered by a recently developed infrared unit.
Chlorine in plant nutrition: Experiments with plants in nutrient solutions establish chlorine as a micronutrient essential to plant growth
by Perry R. Stout, C. M. Johnson, T. C. Broyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A severe nutritional deficiency disease occurred in tomato plants growing in experimental cultures after chlorine was removed from the nutrient solutions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A severe nutritional deficiency disease occurred in tomato plants growing in experimental cultures after chlorine was removed from the nutrient solutions.
Gains of two types of lambs: Suffolk-Corriedale crosses gained faster and weighed more at weaning than Corriedale crosses during comparative study
by D. T. Torell, D. W. Cassard, W. C. Weir, J. F. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Suffolk-sired lambs from grade Corriedale ewes gained faster than Corriedale-sired lambs during a three-year study at the Hopland Field Station. Also, male lambs were heavier than females within their own breed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Suffolk-sired lambs from grade Corriedale ewes gained faster than Corriedale-sired lambs during a three-year study at the Hopland Field Station. Also, male lambs were heavier than females within their own breed.
Seedling growth on burned soil: Effect of prescribed burning on soil fertility reflected by the growth of pine seedlings in study of nutrient response
by J. Vlamis, H. H. Biswell, A. M. Schultr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ponderosa pine seedlings were used in a study of soil fertility changes induced by prescribed burning to learn whether nutrient responses would be reflected by a crop natural to the soil.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ponderosa pine seedlings were used in a study of soil fertility changes induced by prescribed burning to learn whether nutrient responses would be reflected by a crop natural to the soil.
Drought-tolerating ornamentals: Natives and introductions from like climates require little water or maintenance and are adaptable to rural landscape
by Robert B. Deering
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Drought-tolerating plants are useful for landscaping areas which do not normally receive irrigation water. They are especially adaptable to the rural home landscape because there is usually sufficient space for them to grow in areas which will not receive summer water. They can be valuable as windbreaks and screens for buildings and machinery.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Drought-tolerating plants are useful for landscaping areas which do not normally receive irrigation water. They are especially adaptable to the rural home landscape because there is usually sufficient space for them to grow in areas which will not receive summer water. They can be valuable as windbreaks and screens for buildings and machinery.

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