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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.5

Increased lamb production
May 1956
Volume 10, Number 5

Research articles

Household buyers choose beef: Interviewees in Berkeley survey give reasons for selection between U. S. Good and U. S. Choice sirloin steak and rib roast
by Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The leaner cuts of beef were preferred by the 1,125 buyers of the family meat supply who were interviewed in a study conducted in 15 large food stores in Berkeley. The preference for the leaner meat was indicated by what the buyers said they looked for in determining quality of beef, in the selections they made between steaks and roasts graded U. S. Choice and U. S. Good and in their reasons for their selections.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The leaner cuts of beef were preferred by the 1,125 buyers of the family meat supply who were interviewed in a study conducted in 15 large food stores in Berkeley. The preference for the leaner meat was indicated by what the buyers said they looked for in determining quality of beef, in the selections they made between steaks and roasts graded U. S. Choice and U. S. Good and in their reasons for their selections.
Managing deer on private land: Range liability converted to asset by plan of dual stocking and harvesting the game crop by a system of permit hunting
by William M. Longhurst, Walter E. Howard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deer damage to agricultural crops has been reported in 53 of California's 58 counties, where the deer often compete with livestock for forage and, in some cases, carry parasites and diseases that can affect domestic livestock.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deer damage to agricultural crops has been reported in 53 of California's 58 counties, where the deer often compete with livestock for forage and, in some cases, carry parasites and diseases that can affect domestic livestock.
Improved pastures for lambs: In comparative trials improved pastures produced 133.7 pounds of lamb per acre, unimproved range produced 18.4 pounds
by D. T. Torell, A. H. Murphy, W. C. Weir, R. M. Love
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Improved, fertilized pastures at the Hopland Field Station produced approximately seven times as much lamb per acre in 1955 as did the unimproved range. The increased lamb production was due in part to the much earlier and more abundant range forage produced in the fertilized pastures.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Improved, fertilized pastures at the Hopland Field Station produced approximately seven times as much lamb per acre in 1955 as did the unimproved range. The increased lamb production was due in part to the much earlier and more abundant range forage produced in the fertilized pastures.
Wilt resistant blackeye beans: Results of tests in 1955 on the new Grant variety in southern California indicate fusarium wiIt resistance
by Donald C. Erwin, Ivan J. Thomason
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new variety of blackeye beans— Vigna sinensis—known as Grant has shown resistance to Fusarium wilt in field tests in the Chino Valley of San Bernardino County in 1955 and in greenhouse tests. A high level of resistance in the Grant to the race—or races—was noted on two properties in that area where the wilt fungus was present.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new variety of blackeye beans— Vigna sinensis—known as Grant has shown resistance to Fusarium wilt in field tests in the Chino Valley of San Bernardino County in 1955 and in greenhouse tests. A high level of resistance in the Grant to the race—or races—was noted on two properties in that area where the wilt fungus was present.
Rooting cuttings under mist: Species adaptable to mist propagation can be rooted rapidly and in high percentages while requiring but little attention
by H. T. Hartmann, John E. Whisler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Certain varieties of peach, plum, apricot, cherry, pear, grape, olive and lemon—as well as many woody ornamental species—have been propagated by cuttings under mist in percentages high enough to make this method commercially feasible. However, there is considerable variation—among varieties within a species—in the ease with which cuttings can be rooted even under mist.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Certain varieties of peach, plum, apricot, cherry, pear, grape, olive and lemon—as well as many woody ornamental species—have been propagated by cuttings under mist in percentages high enough to make this method commercially feasible. However, there is considerable variation—among varieties within a species—in the ease with which cuttings can be rooted even under mist.
Soil drainage investigations: Soil conditions and source of water to be drained must be known before the installation of successful drainage system
by James N. Luthin, V. H. Scott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The solution of a particularly difficult drainage problem in the Sacramento Valley—resulting from river seepage—involved the use of several investigation techniques.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The solution of a particularly difficult drainage problem in the Sacramento Valley—resulting from river seepage—involved the use of several investigation techniques.
Machine harvesting of grapes: Annual labor requirements stabilized by shifting part of the harvest work to growing season when labor needs slacken
by A. J. Winkler, Lloyd H. Lamouria
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Efficient labor management on the 437,000 acres of California grapes has . been difficult to attain because—according to the State of California Department of Employment—there has been a statewide seasonal labor fluctuation of 6:1 in agricultural crops. The peak harvest labor demand of 360,000 man weeks was not easily obtained.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Efficient labor management on the 437,000 acres of California grapes has . been difficult to attain because—according to the State of California Department of Employment—there has been a statewide seasonal labor fluctuation of 6:1 in agricultural crops. The peak harvest labor demand of 360,000 man weeks was not easily obtained.
Insecticides for alfalfa aphid: Chemical control of spotted alfalfa aphid essential until natural enemies or resistant alfalfa varieties available
by Harold T. Reynolds, Ray F. Smith, John E. Swift
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many insecticides will kill the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—but even the most effective chemicals provide only a temporary relief from aphid attack. In most infested areas chemical control of the aphid is essential for successful alfalfa production. Furthermore, chemical control will continue to be essential until highly promising research on resistant alfalfa varieties— adapted to California growing conditions—can be completed or until fungus diseases or imported beneficial insects provide a more permanent control. Unchecked, this aphid can hamper alfalfa production, reduce the yield, and impair the quality of alfalfa hay, but it can be controlled economically by the careful use of chemical treatments that are properly applied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many insecticides will kill the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—but even the most effective chemicals provide only a temporary relief from aphid attack. In most infested areas chemical control of the aphid is essential for successful alfalfa production. Furthermore, chemical control will continue to be essential until highly promising research on resistant alfalfa varieties— adapted to California growing conditions—can be completed or until fungus diseases or imported beneficial insects provide a more permanent control. Unchecked, this aphid can hamper alfalfa production, reduce the yield, and impair the quality of alfalfa hay, but it can be controlled economically by the careful use of chemical treatments that are properly applied.
The walnut husk fly: Pest new in northern California found in Sonoma valley and near Santa Rosa
by A. E. Michelbacher, Robert L. Sisson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The walnut husk fly—Rhagoletis completa Cresson—was not known to exist in northern California until its discovery in a small walnut orchard near Sonoma in 1954. Because the find was made late in the fall, there was no opportunity to study the distribution of the pest in northern California that season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The walnut husk fly—Rhagoletis completa Cresson—was not known to exist in northern California until its discovery in a small walnut orchard near Sonoma in 1954. Because the find was made late in the fall, there was no opportunity to study the distribution of the pest in northern California that season.
Bud initiation of azaleas: Preliminary studies on flower development indicate frequent removal of branch terminals will produce abundant flowering
by Harry C. Kohl, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Azalea plants are forced to bloom in large quantities for the retail market from Christmas through Easter. To achieve an abundance of flowers, even flowering, and rapid forcing, the grower must remove branch terminals—pinch— frequently to cause profuse branching which is a foreunner to abundant flowering. To make the plants flower rapidly they must be given a low temperature treatment after the buds are developed and before forcing begins. For an even flowering all buds must be initiated and developed simultaneously.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Azalea plants are forced to bloom in large quantities for the retail market from Christmas through Easter. To achieve an abundance of flowers, even flowering, and rapid forcing, the grower must remove branch terminals—pinch— frequently to cause profuse branching which is a foreunner to abundant flowering. To make the plants flower rapidly they must be given a low temperature treatment after the buds are developed and before forcing begins. For an even flowering all buds must be initiated and developed simultaneously.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.5

Increased lamb production
May 1956
Volume 10, Number 5

Research articles

Household buyers choose beef: Interviewees in Berkeley survey give reasons for selection between U. S. Good and U. S. Choice sirloin steak and rib roast
by Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The leaner cuts of beef were preferred by the 1,125 buyers of the family meat supply who were interviewed in a study conducted in 15 large food stores in Berkeley. The preference for the leaner meat was indicated by what the buyers said they looked for in determining quality of beef, in the selections they made between steaks and roasts graded U. S. Choice and U. S. Good and in their reasons for their selections.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The leaner cuts of beef were preferred by the 1,125 buyers of the family meat supply who were interviewed in a study conducted in 15 large food stores in Berkeley. The preference for the leaner meat was indicated by what the buyers said they looked for in determining quality of beef, in the selections they made between steaks and roasts graded U. S. Choice and U. S. Good and in their reasons for their selections.
Managing deer on private land: Range liability converted to asset by plan of dual stocking and harvesting the game crop by a system of permit hunting
by William M. Longhurst, Walter E. Howard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deer damage to agricultural crops has been reported in 53 of California's 58 counties, where the deer often compete with livestock for forage and, in some cases, carry parasites and diseases that can affect domestic livestock.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deer damage to agricultural crops has been reported in 53 of California's 58 counties, where the deer often compete with livestock for forage and, in some cases, carry parasites and diseases that can affect domestic livestock.
Improved pastures for lambs: In comparative trials improved pastures produced 133.7 pounds of lamb per acre, unimproved range produced 18.4 pounds
by D. T. Torell, A. H. Murphy, W. C. Weir, R. M. Love
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Improved, fertilized pastures at the Hopland Field Station produced approximately seven times as much lamb per acre in 1955 as did the unimproved range. The increased lamb production was due in part to the much earlier and more abundant range forage produced in the fertilized pastures.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Improved, fertilized pastures at the Hopland Field Station produced approximately seven times as much lamb per acre in 1955 as did the unimproved range. The increased lamb production was due in part to the much earlier and more abundant range forage produced in the fertilized pastures.
Wilt resistant blackeye beans: Results of tests in 1955 on the new Grant variety in southern California indicate fusarium wiIt resistance
by Donald C. Erwin, Ivan J. Thomason
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new variety of blackeye beans— Vigna sinensis—known as Grant has shown resistance to Fusarium wilt in field tests in the Chino Valley of San Bernardino County in 1955 and in greenhouse tests. A high level of resistance in the Grant to the race—or races—was noted on two properties in that area where the wilt fungus was present.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new variety of blackeye beans— Vigna sinensis—known as Grant has shown resistance to Fusarium wilt in field tests in the Chino Valley of San Bernardino County in 1955 and in greenhouse tests. A high level of resistance in the Grant to the race—or races—was noted on two properties in that area where the wilt fungus was present.
Rooting cuttings under mist: Species adaptable to mist propagation can be rooted rapidly and in high percentages while requiring but little attention
by H. T. Hartmann, John E. Whisler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Certain varieties of peach, plum, apricot, cherry, pear, grape, olive and lemon—as well as many woody ornamental species—have been propagated by cuttings under mist in percentages high enough to make this method commercially feasible. However, there is considerable variation—among varieties within a species—in the ease with which cuttings can be rooted even under mist.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Certain varieties of peach, plum, apricot, cherry, pear, grape, olive and lemon—as well as many woody ornamental species—have been propagated by cuttings under mist in percentages high enough to make this method commercially feasible. However, there is considerable variation—among varieties within a species—in the ease with which cuttings can be rooted even under mist.
Soil drainage investigations: Soil conditions and source of water to be drained must be known before the installation of successful drainage system
by James N. Luthin, V. H. Scott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The solution of a particularly difficult drainage problem in the Sacramento Valley—resulting from river seepage—involved the use of several investigation techniques.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The solution of a particularly difficult drainage problem in the Sacramento Valley—resulting from river seepage—involved the use of several investigation techniques.
Machine harvesting of grapes: Annual labor requirements stabilized by shifting part of the harvest work to growing season when labor needs slacken
by A. J. Winkler, Lloyd H. Lamouria
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Efficient labor management on the 437,000 acres of California grapes has . been difficult to attain because—according to the State of California Department of Employment—there has been a statewide seasonal labor fluctuation of 6:1 in agricultural crops. The peak harvest labor demand of 360,000 man weeks was not easily obtained.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Efficient labor management on the 437,000 acres of California grapes has . been difficult to attain because—according to the State of California Department of Employment—there has been a statewide seasonal labor fluctuation of 6:1 in agricultural crops. The peak harvest labor demand of 360,000 man weeks was not easily obtained.
Insecticides for alfalfa aphid: Chemical control of spotted alfalfa aphid essential until natural enemies or resistant alfalfa varieties available
by Harold T. Reynolds, Ray F. Smith, John E. Swift
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many insecticides will kill the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—but even the most effective chemicals provide only a temporary relief from aphid attack. In most infested areas chemical control of the aphid is essential for successful alfalfa production. Furthermore, chemical control will continue to be essential until highly promising research on resistant alfalfa varieties— adapted to California growing conditions—can be completed or until fungus diseases or imported beneficial insects provide a more permanent control. Unchecked, this aphid can hamper alfalfa production, reduce the yield, and impair the quality of alfalfa hay, but it can be controlled economically by the careful use of chemical treatments that are properly applied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many insecticides will kill the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—but even the most effective chemicals provide only a temporary relief from aphid attack. In most infested areas chemical control of the aphid is essential for successful alfalfa production. Furthermore, chemical control will continue to be essential until highly promising research on resistant alfalfa varieties— adapted to California growing conditions—can be completed or until fungus diseases or imported beneficial insects provide a more permanent control. Unchecked, this aphid can hamper alfalfa production, reduce the yield, and impair the quality of alfalfa hay, but it can be controlled economically by the careful use of chemical treatments that are properly applied.
The walnut husk fly: Pest new in northern California found in Sonoma valley and near Santa Rosa
by A. E. Michelbacher, Robert L. Sisson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The walnut husk fly—Rhagoletis completa Cresson—was not known to exist in northern California until its discovery in a small walnut orchard near Sonoma in 1954. Because the find was made late in the fall, there was no opportunity to study the distribution of the pest in northern California that season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The walnut husk fly—Rhagoletis completa Cresson—was not known to exist in northern California until its discovery in a small walnut orchard near Sonoma in 1954. Because the find was made late in the fall, there was no opportunity to study the distribution of the pest in northern California that season.
Bud initiation of azaleas: Preliminary studies on flower development indicate frequent removal of branch terminals will produce abundant flowering
by Harry C. Kohl, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Azalea plants are forced to bloom in large quantities for the retail market from Christmas through Easter. To achieve an abundance of flowers, even flowering, and rapid forcing, the grower must remove branch terminals—pinch— frequently to cause profuse branching which is a foreunner to abundant flowering. To make the plants flower rapidly they must be given a low temperature treatment after the buds are developed and before forcing begins. For an even flowering all buds must be initiated and developed simultaneously.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Azalea plants are forced to bloom in large quantities for the retail market from Christmas through Easter. To achieve an abundance of flowers, even flowering, and rapid forcing, the grower must remove branch terminals—pinch— frequently to cause profuse branching which is a foreunner to abundant flowering. To make the plants flower rapidly they must be given a low temperature treatment after the buds are developed and before forcing begins. For an even flowering all buds must be initiated and developed simultaneously.

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