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Vertical distribution of fungus suggests… rigolen plowing for control of Verticillium wilt in cotton

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Authors

Stephen Wilhelm, University of California
J. E. Sagen, University of California
Helga Tietz, University of California
Alan G. George

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(5):2-4.

Published May 01, 1967

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Abstract

Control of soil-borne plant diseases by the “rigolen” method of plowing means the careful inversion of the surface soil (usually about the first foot) with soil from below. Knowing that crops generally produced less and less when grown repeatedly without rotation in the same soil, but not knowing why, an unknown farmer developed the rigolen or soil-inversion technique over a century ago to counter diminishing yields. Thus, rigolen plowing (spades were used in the early days) was developed before the causes of soil-borne plant diseases were known. Actually, rigolen plowing is a method for controlling soil-borne diseases by rotation—but the soil, not the crop, is rotated. This three-year study was conducted to determine whether the rigolen method would control soil-borne diseases today—and especially Verticillium wilt of cotton.

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Author notes

Research from which the: progress report was prepared was sup ported in part by the California Planting Cotton Seed Distributors

Vertical distribution of fungus suggests… rigolen plowing for control of Verticillium wilt in cotton

Stephen Wilhelm, J. E. Sagen, Helga Tietz, Alan G. George
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Vertical distribution of fungus suggests… rigolen plowing for control of Verticillium wilt in cotton

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Stephen Wilhelm, University of California
J. E. Sagen, University of California
Helga Tietz, University of California
Alan G. George

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(5):2-4.

Published May 01, 1967

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Control of soil-borne plant diseases by the “rigolen” method of plowing means the careful inversion of the surface soil (usually about the first foot) with soil from below. Knowing that crops generally produced less and less when grown repeatedly without rotation in the same soil, but not knowing why, an unknown farmer developed the rigolen or soil-inversion technique over a century ago to counter diminishing yields. Thus, rigolen plowing (spades were used in the early days) was developed before the causes of soil-borne plant diseases were known. Actually, rigolen plowing is a method for controlling soil-borne diseases by rotation—but the soil, not the crop, is rotated. This three-year study was conducted to determine whether the rigolen method would control soil-borne diseases today—and especially Verticillium wilt of cotton.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Research from which the: progress report was prepared was sup ported in part by the California Planting Cotton Seed Distributors


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