California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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‘Swan Hill’… a new ornamental fruitless olive for California

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Authors

Hudson T. Hartmann, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(1):4-5.

Published January 01, 1967

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Abstract

The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) has very desirable characteristics for use as an ornamental. It has attractive, gray-green foliage, and develops a picturesque, gnarled trunk and branch system as the tree grows older. It is an evergreen with a willowy-type of shoot growth which makes a very pleasing appearance. The great disadvantage of the olive as a street, lawn, or patio tree is the production of fruits which drop over a long period of time during the winter and early spring months. These, of course, become a great nuisance, discoloring concrete walks, adhering to pedestrians' shoes, and attracting birds which consume some of the olives and further contribute to the litter.

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‘Swan Hill’… a new ornamental fruitless olive for California

Hudson T. Hartmann
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

‘Swan Hill’… a new ornamental fruitless olive for California

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Hudson T. Hartmann, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(1):4-5.

Published January 01, 1967

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) has very desirable characteristics for use as an ornamental. It has attractive, gray-green foliage, and develops a picturesque, gnarled trunk and branch system as the tree grows older. It is an evergreen with a willowy-type of shoot growth which makes a very pleasing appearance. The great disadvantage of the olive as a street, lawn, or patio tree is the production of fruits which drop over a long period of time during the winter and early spring months. These, of course, become a great nuisance, discoloring concrete walks, adhering to pedestrians' shoes, and attracting birds which consume some of the olives and further contribute to the litter.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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