California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Clipping tomato plants aids maturity and uniformity control for mechanical harvesting

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. L. Sims, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(11):4-4.

Published November 01, 1966

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Tests reported here indicate that mechanical clipping of tomato plants may be used satisfactorily to spread harvest dates and obtain plant uniformity. The delay in harvest may be 7 to 14 days depending upon the physiological age of the plants at time of clipping. The first-flower-cluster clipping gave a 7-day delay whereas clipping at the second- and third-flower-cluster stage gave a 14-day delay. A later clipping treatment —when fruits had first begun to form (pea size)—was found to be too late and reduced yields. It is important that an irrigation be made immediately following the clipping. The new growth is rapid, producing a more vigorous and somewhat larger plant.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Clipping tomato plants aids maturity and uniformity control for mechanical harvesting

W. L. Sims
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Clipping tomato plants aids maturity and uniformity control for mechanical harvesting

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. L. Sims, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(11):4-4.

Published November 01, 1966

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Tests reported here indicate that mechanical clipping of tomato plants may be used satisfactorily to spread harvest dates and obtain plant uniformity. The delay in harvest may be 7 to 14 days depending upon the physiological age of the plants at time of clipping. The first-flower-cluster clipping gave a 7-day delay whereas clipping at the second- and third-flower-cluster stage gave a 14-day delay. A later clipping treatment —when fruits had first begun to form (pea size)—was found to be too late and reduced yields. It is important that an irrigation be made immediately following the clipping. The new growth is rapid, producing a more vigorous and somewhat larger plant.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu