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Dwarfing carnations with CCC for pot plant sales

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Authors

A. M. Kofranek
R. H. Sciaroni
Y. J. Kubota, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 16(9):12-13.

Published September 01, 1962

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Abstract

Use of the growth retardant chemical CCC offers floriculturists the possibility of producing dwarfed carnations for potted plant sales along with the now-popular chrysanthemum and poinsettia plants. However, several problems remain to be solved before it can become a commercial practice. Plants treated either by soaking a rooted cutting or by soaking the soil vary greatly in height and flowering time. This means that until further research is conducted, plants should only be grown and treated in small containers where selections for sale can be made near the time of flowering.

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Author notes

The CCC material was supplied for the tests by the American Cyanamid Company.

Dwarfing carnations with CCC for pot plant sales

A. M. Kofranek, R. H. Sciaroni, Y. J. Kubota
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Dwarfing carnations with CCC for pot plant sales

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

A. M. Kofranek
R. H. Sciaroni
Y. J. Kubota, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 16(9):12-13.

Published September 01, 1962

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Use of the growth retardant chemical CCC offers floriculturists the possibility of producing dwarfed carnations for potted plant sales along with the now-popular chrysanthemum and poinsettia plants. However, several problems remain to be solved before it can become a commercial practice. Plants treated either by soaking a rooted cutting or by soaking the soil vary greatly in height and flowering time. This means that until further research is conducted, plants should only be grown and treated in small containers where selections for sale can be made near the time of flowering.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The CCC material was supplied for the tests by the American Cyanamid Company.


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