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Nematodes in plant quarantine: Detection of plant parasitic nematode infestations difficult because of complexity of possible causes of visible symptoms

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Authors

W. H. Hart, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(9):4-5.

Published September 01, 1959

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Abstract

Nearly all the major crop pests in California–including plant parasitic nematodes–have been introduced on or in host plants or as contaminants on articles of commerce. There are, however, a number of nematode species of serious economic importance in other parts of the world which are not known to occur in California. The golden nematode is a serious pest of potato in Europe and on Long Island, New York; the sting nematode injures many crops in the southeastern states; the soybean cyst nematode, in the Mississippi Valley and other southeastern states, attacks soybean, snapbean, and other plants of the bean family; and the burrowing nematode, reported to be the cause of spreading decline of citrus in Florida, are some of the nematode species not yet established in California.

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Nematodes in plant quarantine: Detection of plant parasitic nematode infestations difficult because of complexity of possible causes of visible symptoms

W. H. Hart
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Nematodes in plant quarantine: Detection of plant parasitic nematode infestations difficult because of complexity of possible causes of visible symptoms

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. H. Hart, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(9):4-5.

Published September 01, 1959

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Nearly all the major crop pests in California–including plant parasitic nematodes–have been introduced on or in host plants or as contaminants on articles of commerce. There are, however, a number of nematode species of serious economic importance in other parts of the world which are not known to occur in California. The golden nematode is a serious pest of potato in Europe and on Long Island, New York; the sting nematode injures many crops in the southeastern states; the soybean cyst nematode, in the Mississippi Valley and other southeastern states, attacks soybean, snapbean, and other plants of the bean family; and the burrowing nematode, reported to be the cause of spreading decline of citrus in Florida, are some of the nematode species not yet established in California.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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