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Early grain storage research

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California Agriculture 68(1):41-41. DOI: 10.3733/ca.v068n01p41.

Published online January 01, 2014

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1947 — “Many insects that infest grain in farm storage are small. Some are smaller than a grain of wheat. In fact, with some species, a single kernel of grain furnishes sufficient food for the development of from one to several individuals.

“Among the more important pests are the granary weevil, rice weevil, lesser grain borer, Angoumois grain moth, confused flour beetle and the saw-toothed grain beetle. The first four mentioned are capable of attacking and destroying sound grain. The others generally feed upon broken grains, particularly the finer particles.

“Where the environment is favorable, these insects cause serious damage and under extreme conditions the grain may be completely destroyed. Most of the important grain pests are widespread throughout California and if grain is not properly protected it is subject to heavy infestation.

“The development of stored grain pests is largely regulated by temperature and the moisture content of the food on which they feed. The most favorable temperature range is from 80 to 85 Deg. F; while the most ideal moisture content of the food ranges from 13 to 17 per cent.”

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Author notes

At the time of this writing, author Abraham E. Michelbacher was assistant professor of entomology and assistant entomologist at the Agricultural Experiment Station at UC Berkeley. He went on to become a full professor and leader in UC Berkeley's Department of Entomology, as well as a pioneer in the fields of biological pest control and the specifically targeted use of pesticides. After retirement in 1960, he was named professor emeritus and continued his research and Extension work for nearly 30 years more. Michelbacher died in 1991, aged 92.

Early grain storage research

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Early grain storage research

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Editors

Publication Information

California Agriculture 68(1):41-41. DOI: 10.3733/ca.v068n01p41.

Published online January 01, 2014

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Full text

1947 — “Many insects that infest grain in farm storage are small. Some are smaller than a grain of wheat. In fact, with some species, a single kernel of grain furnishes sufficient food for the development of from one to several individuals.

“Among the more important pests are the granary weevil, rice weevil, lesser grain borer, Angoumois grain moth, confused flour beetle and the saw-toothed grain beetle. The first four mentioned are capable of attacking and destroying sound grain. The others generally feed upon broken grains, particularly the finer particles.

“Where the environment is favorable, these insects cause serious damage and under extreme conditions the grain may be completely destroyed. Most of the important grain pests are widespread throughout California and if grain is not properly protected it is subject to heavy infestation.

“The development of stored grain pests is largely regulated by temperature and the moisture content of the food on which they feed. The most favorable temperature range is from 80 to 85 Deg. F; while the most ideal moisture content of the food ranges from 13 to 17 per cent.”

Return to top

Author notes

At the time of this writing, author Abraham E. Michelbacher was assistant professor of entomology and assistant entomologist at the Agricultural Experiment Station at UC Berkeley. He went on to become a full professor and leader in UC Berkeley's Department of Entomology, as well as a pioneer in the fields of biological pest control and the specifically targeted use of pesticides. After retirement in 1960, he was named professor emeritus and continued his research and Extension work for nearly 30 years more. Michelbacher died in 1991, aged 92.


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