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California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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2009 Index

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Publication Information

California Agriculture 64(1):47-47.

Published January 01, 2010

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Full text

The following peer-reviewed research articles, and news and editorial coverage, were published in California Agriculture, Volume 63, Numbers 1 to 4 (January-March, April-June, July-September, October-December), 2009. Back issues are $5 per copy, while supplies last. To subscribe to the journal, order back issues, search the archives or download PDFs of all research articles in full, go to: http://CaliforniaAgriculture.ucanr.org .

January-March, 63(1)

April-June, 63(2)

July-September, 63(3)

October-December, 63(4)

Research and review articles

Animal, Avian, Aquaculture and veterinary Sciences

Castillo AR. Whole-farm nutrient balances are an important tool for California dairy farms. 63(3):149-51.

Kobayashi M, Howitt RE, Carpenter TE. Model could aid emergency response planning for foot-and-mouth disease outbreaks. 63(3):137-42.

Mitloehner FM, Sun H, Karlik JF. Direct measurements improve estimates of dairy greenhouse-gas emissions. 63(2):79-83. CC

Moore DA, Adaska JM, Higginbotham GE, et al. Testing new dairy cattle for disease can boost herd health, cut costs. 63(1):29-34.

Economics and public policy

Blank SC, Forero LC, Nader GA. Video market data for calves and yearlings confirms price discounts for Western cattle. 63(4):225-31.

Blank S, Klonsky K, Fuller K, et al. Hay harvesting services respond to market trends. 63(3):143-8.

Howitt RE, Català-Luque R, De Gryze S, et al. Realistic payments could encourage farmers to adopt practices that sequester carbon. 63(2):91-5. CC

Jetter KM, Godfrey K. Diaprepes root weevil, a new California pest, will raise costs for pest control and trigger quarantines. 63(3):121-6.

Niemeier D, Rowan D. From kiosks to megastores: The evolving carbon market. 63(2):96-103. CC

Rajagopal D, Sexton S, Hochman G, et al. Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-off. 63(4):199-201. BF

Sexton S, Rajagopal D, Hochman G, et al. Biofuel policy must evaluate environmental, food security and energy goals to maximize net benefits. 63(4):191-8. BF

Human and community development

Carlos RM, Borba JA, Heck KE, et al. Survey explores teen driving behavior in Central Valley, Los Angeles high schools. 63(4):208-14.

Forero L, Heck KE, Weliver P, et al. Member record books are useful tools for evaluating 4-H club programs. 63(4):215-9.

Land, air and water sciences

De Gryze S, Albarracin MV, Català-Luque R, et al. Modeling shows that alternative soil management can decrease greenhouse gases. 63(2):84-90. CC

Hanson BR, May DE, Šim?nek nek J, et al. Drip irrigation provides the salinity control needed for profitable irrigation of tomatoes in the San Joaquin Valley. 63(3):131-6.

Jenkins BM, Williams RB, Parker N, et al. Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets. 63(4):168-77. BF

Stapleton JJ, Bañuelos GS. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water. 63(1):41-6. BF

Weare BC. How will changes in global climate influence California? 63(2):59-66. CC

Wyman CE, Yang B. Cellulosic biomass could meet California's transportation fuel needs. 63(4):185-90. BF

Zhong L, Hawkins T, Holland K, et al. Satellite imagery can support water planning in the Central Valley. 63(4):220-4.

Natural resources

Frankie GW, Thorp RW, Hernandez J, et al. Native bees are a rich natural resource in urban California gardens. 63(3):113-20.

Pest management

Trumble JT, Butler CD. Climate change will exacerbate California's insect pest problems. 63(2):73-8. CC

Plant sciences

Bartley LE, Ronald PC. Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose. 63(4):178-84. BF

Bloom AJ. As carbon dioxide rises, food quality will decline without careful nitrogen management. 63(2):67-72. CC

Farrar JJ, Nunez JJ, Davis RM. Losses due to lenticel rot are an increasing concern for Kern County potato growers. 63(3):127-30.

Garbelotto M, Schmidt DJ. Phosphonate controls sudden oak death pathogen for up to 2 years. 63(1):10-7.

Higbee BS, Siegel JP. New navel orange-worm sanitation standards could reduce almond damage. 63(1):24-8.

Kaffka SR. Can feedstock production for biofuels be sustainable in California? 63(4):202-7. BF

Kallsen CE, Parfitt DE, Maranto J, Holtz BA. New pistachio varieties show promise for California cultivation. 63(1):18-23.

Summers CG, Mitchell JP, Prather TS, Stapleton JJ. Sudex cover crops can kill and stunt subsequent tomato, lettuce and broccoli transplants through allelopathy. 63(1):35-40.

News departments

Editorials/Editorial overviews

Allen-Diaz B. Climate change affects us all. 63(2):51-3 (overview).

Alston JM, Pardey PG, James JS. Setting agricultural science strategy in tumultuous economic times. 63(1):2.

Dooley DM. Focus on the future: Implementing the ANR strategic vision. 63(3):106.

Jenkins BM, Somerville C, Stapleton JJ. Biofuels: Growing toward sustainability. 63(4):155-8 (overview).

SIDEBAR: Biofuel terms defined. 63(4):158.

index 2008

63(1):47.

Letters

63(1):5; 63(3):109.

Other news

Cal Ag editors win silver ACE award. 63(3):109.

Sixty-three years of California Agriculture now online. 63(3):110.

Outlook

Batkin T, Curtis R. Sustained public investment needed for agricultural research. 63(1):6-7.

Research news

Biofuels caught in changing regulations. 63(4):162-4. BF

Climate change threatens California's native plants. 63(2):57. CC

Dozens of UC research projects pursue fossil-fuel alternatives. 63(4):165-7. BF

Genetics and breeding help build a better, stronger bee. 63(3):111-2

Honey bee haven to encourage bee-friendly gardening. 63(3):112.

Science-based outreach helps stem sudden oak death. 63(1):8-9.

The 50th anniversary of a great idea. 63(4):160-1.

UC scientists help California prepare for climate change. 63(2):56-8. CC

Science briefs

California salmonids face extinction. 63(1):5

Climate-change modeling finds many crop yields are likely to decline. 63(2):55.

“Low-carbon diet” research looks at total energy usage of foods. 63(2):55.

Special issue key

CC = Climate change

BF = Biofuels

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2009 Index

Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

2009 Index

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Editors

Publication Information

California Agriculture 64(1):47-47.

Published January 01, 2010

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Full text

The following peer-reviewed research articles, and news and editorial coverage, were published in California Agriculture, Volume 63, Numbers 1 to 4 (January-March, April-June, July-September, October-December), 2009. Back issues are $5 per copy, while supplies last. To subscribe to the journal, order back issues, search the archives or download PDFs of all research articles in full, go to: http://CaliforniaAgriculture.ucanr.org .

January-March, 63(1)

April-June, 63(2)

July-September, 63(3)

October-December, 63(4)

Research and review articles

Animal, Avian, Aquaculture and veterinary Sciences

Castillo AR. Whole-farm nutrient balances are an important tool for California dairy farms. 63(3):149-51.

Kobayashi M, Howitt RE, Carpenter TE. Model could aid emergency response planning for foot-and-mouth disease outbreaks. 63(3):137-42.

Mitloehner FM, Sun H, Karlik JF. Direct measurements improve estimates of dairy greenhouse-gas emissions. 63(2):79-83. CC

Moore DA, Adaska JM, Higginbotham GE, et al. Testing new dairy cattle for disease can boost herd health, cut costs. 63(1):29-34.

Economics and public policy

Blank SC, Forero LC, Nader GA. Video market data for calves and yearlings confirms price discounts for Western cattle. 63(4):225-31.

Blank S, Klonsky K, Fuller K, et al. Hay harvesting services respond to market trends. 63(3):143-8.

Howitt RE, Català-Luque R, De Gryze S, et al. Realistic payments could encourage farmers to adopt practices that sequester carbon. 63(2):91-5. CC

Jetter KM, Godfrey K. Diaprepes root weevil, a new California pest, will raise costs for pest control and trigger quarantines. 63(3):121-6.

Niemeier D, Rowan D. From kiosks to megastores: The evolving carbon market. 63(2):96-103. CC

Rajagopal D, Sexton S, Hochman G, et al. Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-off. 63(4):199-201. BF

Sexton S, Rajagopal D, Hochman G, et al. Biofuel policy must evaluate environmental, food security and energy goals to maximize net benefits. 63(4):191-8. BF

Human and community development

Carlos RM, Borba JA, Heck KE, et al. Survey explores teen driving behavior in Central Valley, Los Angeles high schools. 63(4):208-14.

Forero L, Heck KE, Weliver P, et al. Member record books are useful tools for evaluating 4-H club programs. 63(4):215-9.

Land, air and water sciences

De Gryze S, Albarracin MV, Català-Luque R, et al. Modeling shows that alternative soil management can decrease greenhouse gases. 63(2):84-90. CC

Hanson BR, May DE, Šim?nek nek J, et al. Drip irrigation provides the salinity control needed for profitable irrigation of tomatoes in the San Joaquin Valley. 63(3):131-6.

Jenkins BM, Williams RB, Parker N, et al. Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets. 63(4):168-77. BF

Stapleton JJ, Bañuelos GS. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water. 63(1):41-6. BF

Weare BC. How will changes in global climate influence California? 63(2):59-66. CC

Wyman CE, Yang B. Cellulosic biomass could meet California's transportation fuel needs. 63(4):185-90. BF

Zhong L, Hawkins T, Holland K, et al. Satellite imagery can support water planning in the Central Valley. 63(4):220-4.

Natural resources

Frankie GW, Thorp RW, Hernandez J, et al. Native bees are a rich natural resource in urban California gardens. 63(3):113-20.

Pest management

Trumble JT, Butler CD. Climate change will exacerbate California's insect pest problems. 63(2):73-8. CC

Plant sciences

Bartley LE, Ronald PC. Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose. 63(4):178-84. BF

Bloom AJ. As carbon dioxide rises, food quality will decline without careful nitrogen management. 63(2):67-72. CC

Farrar JJ, Nunez JJ, Davis RM. Losses due to lenticel rot are an increasing concern for Kern County potato growers. 63(3):127-30.

Garbelotto M, Schmidt DJ. Phosphonate controls sudden oak death pathogen for up to 2 years. 63(1):10-7.

Higbee BS, Siegel JP. New navel orange-worm sanitation standards could reduce almond damage. 63(1):24-8.

Kaffka SR. Can feedstock production for biofuels be sustainable in California? 63(4):202-7. BF

Kallsen CE, Parfitt DE, Maranto J, Holtz BA. New pistachio varieties show promise for California cultivation. 63(1):18-23.

Summers CG, Mitchell JP, Prather TS, Stapleton JJ. Sudex cover crops can kill and stunt subsequent tomato, lettuce and broccoli transplants through allelopathy. 63(1):35-40.

News departments

Editorials/Editorial overviews

Allen-Diaz B. Climate change affects us all. 63(2):51-3 (overview).

Alston JM, Pardey PG, James JS. Setting agricultural science strategy in tumultuous economic times. 63(1):2.

Dooley DM. Focus on the future: Implementing the ANR strategic vision. 63(3):106.

Jenkins BM, Somerville C, Stapleton JJ. Biofuels: Growing toward sustainability. 63(4):155-8 (overview).

SIDEBAR: Biofuel terms defined. 63(4):158.

index 2008

63(1):47.

Letters

63(1):5; 63(3):109.

Other news

Cal Ag editors win silver ACE award. 63(3):109.

Sixty-three years of California Agriculture now online. 63(3):110.

Outlook

Batkin T, Curtis R. Sustained public investment needed for agricultural research. 63(1):6-7.

Research news

Biofuels caught in changing regulations. 63(4):162-4. BF

Climate change threatens California's native plants. 63(2):57. CC

Dozens of UC research projects pursue fossil-fuel alternatives. 63(4):165-7. BF

Genetics and breeding help build a better, stronger bee. 63(3):111-2

Honey bee haven to encourage bee-friendly gardening. 63(3):112.

Science-based outreach helps stem sudden oak death. 63(1):8-9.

The 50th anniversary of a great idea. 63(4):160-1.

UC scientists help California prepare for climate change. 63(2):56-8. CC

Science briefs

California salmonids face extinction. 63(1):5

Climate-change modeling finds many crop yields are likely to decline. 63(2):55.

“Low-carbon diet” research looks at total energy usage of foods. 63(2):55.

Special issue key

CC = Climate change

BF = Biofuels

Return to top


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