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What is biological diversity? Why do we care?

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California Agriculture 49(6):4-4.

Published November 01, 1995

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Our lives, and those of future generations, depend on biological diversity. Scientists have described 1.4 million species on Earth, but they estimate the true total is up to 100 times greater. All contribute to the healthy functioning of the planet. Some with the least appeal — soil fungi, bacteria and insects — are essential workhorses that clean air and water, and recycle nutrients to create fertile soil.

Today the extinction rate is among the highest in the fossil record — perhaps 10 to 1,000 times the background rate. By far the greatest threat to biological diversity is human population growth; Californians will double to 63 million by 2040, usurping open space, wildlife habitat and farmland.

In this issue, we take stock of California's current biological diversity and the roles farmers and ranchers can play in conserving it, while maintaining economic viability. We begin with a look at the current controversies surrounding the Endangered Species Act.

Editor

California Agriculture gratefully acknowledges the contributions of the Guest Editorial Committee for this issue: Michael Clegg and Cal Qualset, co-chairs; Don Erman, Debbie Elliott-Fisk and Terry Salmon.

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What is biological diversity? Why do we care?

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What is biological diversity? Why do we care?

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Editors

Publication Information

California Agriculture 49(6):4-4.

Published November 01, 1995

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Full text

Our lives, and those of future generations, depend on biological diversity. Scientists have described 1.4 million species on Earth, but they estimate the true total is up to 100 times greater. All contribute to the healthy functioning of the planet. Some with the least appeal — soil fungi, bacteria and insects — are essential workhorses that clean air and water, and recycle nutrients to create fertile soil.

Today the extinction rate is among the highest in the fossil record — perhaps 10 to 1,000 times the background rate. By far the greatest threat to biological diversity is human population growth; Californians will double to 63 million by 2040, usurping open space, wildlife habitat and farmland.

In this issue, we take stock of California's current biological diversity and the roles farmers and ranchers can play in conserving it, while maintaining economic viability. We begin with a look at the current controversies surrounding the Endangered Species Act.

Editor

California Agriculture gratefully acknowledges the contributions of the Guest Editorial Committee for this issue: Michael Clegg and Cal Qualset, co-chairs; Don Erman, Debbie Elliott-Fisk and Terry Salmon.

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