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Managing yellow starthistle on rangeland

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Authors

Craig D. Thomsen, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis
William A. Williams, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis
Melvin George, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis
W. B. McHenry, Department of Botany, UC Davis
Fremont L. Bell, Glenn and Colusa counties
Ronald S. Knight, Tehama County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 43(5):4-7.

Published September 01, 1989

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Abstract

Intensive cattle grazing in May and June reduced yellow starthistle plant size, summer and fall canopy size, and seed production in the first year of a 3-year, northern California study. Combining grazing and herbicide applications caused large reductions. Abundant late rains favored yellow starthistle growth.

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Author notes

The authors thank the Salvesons and O'Connells for use of their land, assistance, and hospitality; Jack and Nancy Henderson of Live Wire Products, Marysville for assistance in fencing design and construction at the Salveson Ranch; Jim Pratt for help in Colusa County; John Roncoroni, Staff Research Assistant, Botany Extension, for herbicide applications; and John Menke, Professor, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, UC Davis, for advice. This project is supported by a grant from UC/IPM.

Managing yellow starthistle on rangeland

Craig D. Thomsen, William A. Williams, Melvin George, W. B. McHenry, Fremont L. Bell, Ronald S. Knight
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Managing yellow starthistle on rangeland

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Craig D. Thomsen, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis
William A. Williams, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis
Melvin George, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis
W. B. McHenry, Department of Botany, UC Davis
Fremont L. Bell, Glenn and Colusa counties
Ronald S. Knight, Tehama County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 43(5):4-7.

Published September 01, 1989

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Intensive cattle grazing in May and June reduced yellow starthistle plant size, summer and fall canopy size, and seed production in the first year of a 3-year, northern California study. Combining grazing and herbicide applications caused large reductions. Abundant late rains favored yellow starthistle growth.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The authors thank the Salvesons and O'Connells for use of their land, assistance, and hospitality; Jack and Nancy Henderson of Live Wire Products, Marysville for assistance in fencing design and construction at the Salveson Ranch; Jim Pratt for help in Colusa County; John Roncoroni, Staff Research Assistant, Botany Extension, for herbicide applications; and John Menke, Professor, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, UC Davis, for advice. This project is supported by a grant from UC/IPM.


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