California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California wheat as a feed ingredient for turkeys

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Authors

Susan A. Klasing
David M. Barnes

Publication Information

California Agriculture 42(4):13-14.

Published July 01, 1988

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although wheat is normally considered a grain primarily for human food, it has been used successfully in poultry diets for many years. The amount of wheat included in a least-cost ration formulation depends largely on the price of wheat relative to that of corn or other energy-providing feedstuffs and, to a lesser extent, the price of fat and protein sources. In recent years, considerable amounts of wheat have been included in least-cost formulations for poultry because of a variety of agronomic, economic, and political circumstances.

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California wheat as a feed ingredient for turkeys

Kirk C. Klasing, Susan A. Klasing, David M. Barnes
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

California wheat as a feed ingredient for turkeys

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Susan A. Klasing
David M. Barnes

Publication Information

California Agriculture 42(4):13-14.

Published July 01, 1988

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although wheat is normally considered a grain primarily for human food, it has been used successfully in poultry diets for many years. The amount of wheat included in a least-cost ration formulation depends largely on the price of wheat relative to that of corn or other energy-providing feedstuffs and, to a lesser extent, the price of fat and protein sources. In recent years, considerable amounts of wheat have been included in least-cost formulations for poultry because of a variety of agronomic, economic, and political circumstances.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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