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Coping with the ‘leafminer crisis’

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Authors

Michael P. Parrella , University of California
Vincent P. Jones, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(9):17-19.

Published September 01, 1984

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Development of insecticide resistance of the leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), in chrysanthemum and gerbera greenhouses throughout California has resulted in serious damage. It has been estimated, for example, that California's chrysanthemum industry lost $17 million in 1981. With eventual registration of new insecticides, this “leaf-miner crisis” should be considerably reduced, but the new materials cannot be viewed as long-term solutions to the problem. Growers must strive to maximize the effective field life of these new compounds by using them only when they are needed. In addition, until these new insecticides gain registration, growers must maximize the efficacy of existing compounds.

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Author notes

This research was supported by SAFE Endowment.

Coping with the ‘leafminer crisis’

Michael P. Parrella, Vincent P. Jones
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Coping with the ‘leafminer crisis’

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Michael P. Parrella , University of California
Vincent P. Jones, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(9):17-19.

Published September 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Development of insecticide resistance of the leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), in chrysanthemum and gerbera greenhouses throughout California has resulted in serious damage. It has been estimated, for example, that California's chrysanthemum industry lost $17 million in 1981. With eventual registration of new insecticides, this “leaf-miner crisis” should be considerably reduced, but the new materials cannot be viewed as long-term solutions to the problem. Growers must strive to maximize the effective field life of these new compounds by using them only when they are needed. In addition, until these new insecticides gain registration, growers must maximize the efficacy of existing compounds.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This research was supported by SAFE Endowment.


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