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Converting chaparral to grassland increases soil fertility

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Authors

Milton B. Jones, University of California
Robert L. Koenigs, University of California
Charles E. Vaughn, University of California
Alfred H. Murphy, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(9):22-24.

Published September 01, 1983

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Before Europeans arrived, the native Americans burned chaparral brush-lands to drive out wildlife in hunting, and to increase accessibility to the land. Now chaparral is often converted to grassland to help control wildfire, increase feed for livestock and wildlife, and increase water yield, as well as to improve accessibility. Reduced sheet erosion is often another benefit.

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Author notes

This article is based on a paper presented at the XIV International Grassland Congress and published in Proceedings of the XIV International Grassland Congress, edited by J. Allan Smith and Virgil W. Hays; copyright 1982 by Westview Press, Boulder, Colorado.

Converting chaparral to grassland increases soil fertility

Milton B. Jones, Robert L. Koenigs, Charles E. Vaughn, Alfred H. Murphy
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Converting chaparral to grassland increases soil fertility

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Milton B. Jones, University of California
Robert L. Koenigs, University of California
Charles E. Vaughn, University of California
Alfred H. Murphy, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(9):22-24.

Published September 01, 1983

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Before Europeans arrived, the native Americans burned chaparral brush-lands to drive out wildlife in hunting, and to increase accessibility to the land. Now chaparral is often converted to grassland to help control wildfire, increase feed for livestock and wildlife, and increase water yield, as well as to improve accessibility. Reduced sheet erosion is often another benefit.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This article is based on a paper presented at the XIV International Grassland Congress and published in Proceedings of the XIV International Grassland Congress, edited by J. Allan Smith and Virgil W. Hays; copyright 1982 by Westview Press, Boulder, Colorado.


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