California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Embryo callus hybrids

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Bruce R. Thomas, U.C., Davis
David Pratt, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):27-27.

Published August 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Hybridization between cultivated species and related wild species has been of great value for cultivar improvement. Genes that enhance the survival of the wild species by providing disease or insect resistance, salt tolerance, cold tolerance, and the like, often confer the same trait on the cultivar to which they are transferred. Fertility barriers restrict the number of wild species that can contribute genes to any particular cultivated species through normal sexual crosses, but these fertility barriers can often be overcome through the use of special procedures.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Embryo callus hybrids

Bruce R. Thomas, David Pratt
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Embryo callus hybrids

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Bruce R. Thomas, U.C., Davis
David Pratt, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):27-27.

Published August 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Hybridization between cultivated species and related wild species has been of great value for cultivar improvement. Genes that enhance the survival of the wild species by providing disease or insect resistance, salt tolerance, cold tolerance, and the like, often confer the same trait on the cultivar to which they are transferred. Fertility barriers restrict the number of wild species that can contribute genes to any particular cultivated species through normal sexual crosses, but these fertility barriers can often be overcome through the use of special procedures.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu