California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Induced chromosome pairing

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Authors

Jonathan Irvine, International Plant Research Institute
Patrick E. McGuire, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):24-24.

Published August 01, 1982

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Success in hybridizing wild with cultivated species ultimately depends on the ability of the alien chromosomes to pair and recombine with the chromosomes of the crop species at meiosis. In bread wheat, pairing and thus recombination normally occur only between identical or homologous chromosomes and not, unfortunately, between a wheat chromosome and an alien chromosome. However, increasing knowledge of the components of the genetic system controlling pairing has made it possible to manipulate them to achieve pairing between nonhomologous chromosomes. A major advantage of such induced pairing is that it usually occurs between closely related but not homologous chromosomes—termed homoeologues. Recombination of genetic material between homoeologues is likely to result in genetically more balanced chromosomes than if recombination were between unrelated chromosomes.

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Induced chromosome pairing

Jonathan Irvine, Patrick E. McGuire
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Induced chromosome pairing

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Jonathan Irvine, International Plant Research Institute
Patrick E. McGuire, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):24-24.

Published August 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Success in hybridizing wild with cultivated species ultimately depends on the ability of the alien chromosomes to pair and recombine with the chromosomes of the crop species at meiosis. In bread wheat, pairing and thus recombination normally occur only between identical or homologous chromosomes and not, unfortunately, between a wheat chromosome and an alien chromosome. However, increasing knowledge of the components of the genetic system controlling pairing has made it possible to manipulate them to achieve pairing between nonhomologous chromosomes. A major advantage of such induced pairing is that it usually occurs between closely related but not homologous chromosomes—termed homoeologues. Recombination of genetic material between homoeologues is likely to result in genetically more balanced chromosomes than if recombination were between unrelated chromosomes.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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