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California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Research has refined pruning concepts

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Authors

Amand N. Kasimatis, Cooperative Extension, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(7):32-32.

Published July 01, 1980

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: In the wild, the grapevine is often supported at great heights by adjacent trees; the shoots cling to branches by means of tendrils and trail for considerable lengths. A favorable light environment is essential for annual growth, so lower or interior areas are characterized by rope-like “trunks,” devoid of leaves, extending from the ground upward to the canopies of trees. Not only is the fruit difficult to locate and harvest, it consists of a myriad of small straggly clusters. Productivity is erratic from year to year.

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Research has refined pruning concepts

Amand N. Kasimatis
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Research has refined pruning concepts

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Amand N. Kasimatis, Cooperative Extension, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(7):32-32.

Published July 01, 1980

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: In the wild, the grapevine is often supported at great heights by adjacent trees; the shoots cling to branches by means of tendrils and trail for considerable lengths. A favorable light environment is essential for annual growth, so lower or interior areas are characterized by rope-like “trunks,” devoid of leaves, extending from the ground upward to the canopies of trees. Not only is the fruit difficult to locate and harvest, it consists of a myriad of small straggly clusters. Productivity is erratic from year to year.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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