California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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Of men and machines: Technological change and people in agriculture Part 1: Changes in farm enterprises and farm families

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Authors

Ann Foley Scheuring, Department of Applied Behavioral Sciences, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(1):4-7.

Published January 01, 1980

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Abstract

Culled from 600 pages of oral history are some recollections of northern California farm families about how technology has changed farming-and its landscape. Farming was hard work in the old days, but it had its rewards. Farming is still hard work today, but there are fewer hands needed to do it.

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Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Orville E. Thompson is a Professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Sciences, U.C., Davis.

—Photos courtesy of F. Hal Higgins Library of Agricultural Technology, University of California Library, Davis

Of men and machines: Technological change and people in agriculture Part 1: Changes in farm enterprises and farm families

Ann Foley Scheuring
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Of men and machines: Technological change and people in agriculture Part 1: Changes in farm enterprises and farm families

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Ann Foley Scheuring, Department of Applied Behavioral Sciences, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(1):4-7.

Published January 01, 1980

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Culled from 600 pages of oral history are some recollections of northern California farm families about how technology has changed farming-and its landscape. Farming was hard work in the old days, but it had its rewards. Farming is still hard work today, but there are fewer hands needed to do it.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Orville E. Thompson is a Professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Sciences, U.C., Davis.

—Photos courtesy of F. Hal Higgins Library of Agricultural Technology, University of California Library, Davis


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