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Citrus germplasm collection is widely used

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Authors

Robert K. Soost, University of California
James W. Cameron, University of California
Willard P. Bitters, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):38-39.

Published September 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The University of California's citrus variety collection was initiated with the establishment of the Citrus Experiment Station (CES) in 1910, at what is now UC's Riverside Campus (UCR). The collection, numbering more than 1200 accessions from throughout the world, has been used extensively to solve citrus disease problems, improve varieties, and congregate and preserve valuable germplasm resources.

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Citrus germplasm collection is widely used

Robert K. Soost, James W. Cameron, Willard P. Bitters
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Citrus germplasm collection is widely used

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Robert K. Soost, University of California
James W. Cameron, University of California
Willard P. Bitters, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):38-39.

Published September 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The University of California's citrus variety collection was initiated with the establishment of the Citrus Experiment Station (CES) in 1910, at what is now UC's Riverside Campus (UCR). The collection, numbering more than 1200 accessions from throughout the world, has been used extensively to solve citrus disease problems, improve varieties, and congregate and preserve valuable germplasm resources.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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