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Hydrobiological studies in the sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

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Authors

Clifford A. Siegfried

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):29-29.

Published May 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta carries about 42 percent of the natural runoff of the state. It is high in biological productivity, receiving nutrient-laden waters from municipal and industrial activities and from intensively cultivated agricultural land surrounding the basin. The Delta supports important freshwater fisheries and serves both as a nursery ground for marine species and as an access route and habitat for young and adult anadromous species important in the states sport fishery.

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Hydrobiological studies in the sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

Clifford A. Siegfried, Allen W. Knight
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Hydrobiological studies in the sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Clifford A. Siegfried

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):29-29.

Published May 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta carries about 42 percent of the natural runoff of the state. It is high in biological productivity, receiving nutrient-laden waters from municipal and industrial activities and from intensively cultivated agricultural land surrounding the basin. The Delta supports important freshwater fisheries and serves both as a nursery ground for marine species and as an access route and habitat for young and adult anadromous species important in the states sport fishery.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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