California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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Irrigation management conserves water

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Authors

Jan van Schilfgaarde, U.S. Salinity Laboratory
J. D. Oster, U.S. Salinity Laboratory

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):15-16.

Published May 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Californians are acutely aware that water is a valuable and scarce resource and are concerned about protecting its quantity and quality. Irrigated agriculture, the states biggest water user, depends on good-quality water; it also degrades the quality of the drainage water. Supplying irrigation water and disposing of drainage water account for a significant part of our fossil energy consumption. Furthermore, even though irrigated agriculture is crucial to the economy and makes a substantial contribution to supplying the worlds need for food, it must compete with other demands—municipal, industrial, and recreational. The question, then, is what can be done practically to conserve water, in quantity and quality, while maintaining a viable irrigated agriculture.

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Irrigation management conserves water

Jan van Schilfgaarde, J. D. Oster
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Irrigation management conserves water

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Jan van Schilfgaarde, U.S. Salinity Laboratory
J. D. Oster, U.S. Salinity Laboratory

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):15-16.

Published May 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Californians are acutely aware that water is a valuable and scarce resource and are concerned about protecting its quantity and quality. Irrigated agriculture, the states biggest water user, depends on good-quality water; it also degrades the quality of the drainage water. Supplying irrigation water and disposing of drainage water account for a significant part of our fossil energy consumption. Furthermore, even though irrigated agriculture is crucial to the economy and makes a substantial contribution to supplying the worlds need for food, it must compete with other demands—municipal, industrial, and recreational. The question, then, is what can be done practically to conserve water, in quantity and quality, while maintaining a viable irrigated agriculture.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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