California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Root and crown rot of cherry trees

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Srecko m. Mircetich, University of California
Wallace R. Schreader
William J. Moller, University of California
Warren C. Micke, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(8):10-11.

Published August 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Decline and death of bearing cherry trees resulted in an estimated loss of 22 percent of all sweet cherry trees in San Joaquin County during 1973-75. During 1972-74 heavier than normal rainfall occurred, especially during late winter and early spring. In 1975 some orchards were almost 100 percent affected with crown and root rots. In previous years crown and root rot diseases were always prevalent in cherry orchards on poorly drained soil, but in 1975 these losses were excessive, and growers were forced to remove many acres of declining and dead trees.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Root and crown rot of cherry trees

Srecko m. Mircetich, Wallace R. Schreader, William J. Moller, Warren C. Micke
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Root and crown rot of cherry trees

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Srecko m. Mircetich, University of California
Wallace R. Schreader
William J. Moller, University of California
Warren C. Micke, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(8):10-11.

Published August 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Decline and death of bearing cherry trees resulted in an estimated loss of 22 percent of all sweet cherry trees in San Joaquin County during 1973-75. During 1972-74 heavier than normal rainfall occurred, especially during late winter and early spring. In 1975 some orchards were almost 100 percent affected with crown and root rots. In previous years crown and root rot diseases were always prevalent in cherry orchards on poorly drained soil, but in 1975 these losses were excessive, and growers were forced to remove many acres of declining and dead trees.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu