California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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An integrated insect control program for street trees

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Authors

W. Olkowski
C. Pinnock
W. Toney
G. Mosher
W. Neasbitt
R. van Den Bosch
H. Olkowski

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(1):3-4.

Published January 01, 1974

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Abstract

Over the last three years the Recreation and Parks Department of the City of Berkeley has worked with members of the Department of Entomological Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, to develop an integrated insect control program for the city's 30,000 street trees. The program has virtually eliminated synthetic chemical insecticides as regular management tools on the city's 123 species of shade trees. This program has resulted in lower pest management costs, fewer citizen complaints, elimination of secondary pest outbreaks and a reduction in environmental contamination. By reducing the amount of pesticides used, the city of Berkeley saves about $22,500 each year in labor and pesticide costs. The current program is a synthesis of various non-toxic management methods including biological, microbial, cultural, physical—along with the judicious use of chemical controls, when needed.

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An integrated insect control program for street trees

W. Olkowski, C. Pinnock, W. Toney, G. Mosher, W. Neasbitt, R. van Den Bosch, H. Olkowski
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

An integrated insect control program for street trees

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. Olkowski
C. Pinnock
W. Toney
G. Mosher
W. Neasbitt
R. van Den Bosch
H. Olkowski

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(1):3-4.

Published January 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Over the last three years the Recreation and Parks Department of the City of Berkeley has worked with members of the Department of Entomological Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, to develop an integrated insect control program for the city's 30,000 street trees. The program has virtually eliminated synthetic chemical insecticides as regular management tools on the city's 123 species of shade trees. This program has resulted in lower pest management costs, fewer citizen complaints, elimination of secondary pest outbreaks and a reduction in environmental contamination. By reducing the amount of pesticides used, the city of Berkeley saves about $22,500 each year in labor and pesticide costs. The current program is a synthesis of various non-toxic management methods including biological, microbial, cultural, physical—along with the judicious use of chemical controls, when needed.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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