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Protein electrophoresis AIDS cereal variety identification

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Authors

Jennifer Ford Menke, U.C.
R. S. Singh, U.C.
C. O. Qualset, U.C.
S. K. Jain, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 27(10):3-5.

Published October 01, 1973

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Abstract

Enzyme proteins obtained from seedling plants show distinct patterns (isozymes) after migration in an electric field. Crop varieties differ in isozymes, and these differences open new possibilities for “fingerprinting” varieties for identification purposes.

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Author notes

Technical advice was obtained from A. L. Kahler in adapting the isozyme technique for wheat and triticale. This research was supported, in part, by a grant to Jennifer Menke by the Jastro Fund to support undergraduate research, and by a grant from the California Crop Improvement Association.

Protein electrophoresis AIDS cereal variety identification

Jennifer Ford Menke, R. S. Singh, C. O. Qualset, S. K. Jain
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Protein electrophoresis AIDS cereal variety identification

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Jennifer Ford Menke, U.C.
R. S. Singh, U.C.
C. O. Qualset, U.C.
S. K. Jain, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 27(10):3-5.

Published October 01, 1973

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Enzyme proteins obtained from seedling plants show distinct patterns (isozymes) after migration in an electric field. Crop varieties differ in isozymes, and these differences open new possibilities for “fingerprinting” varieties for identification purposes.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Technical advice was obtained from A. L. Kahler in adapting the isozyme technique for wheat and triticale. This research was supported, in part, by a grant to Jennifer Menke by the Jastro Fund to support undergraduate research, and by a grant from the California Crop Improvement Association.


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