California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Air pollution resistance in sweet corn varieties

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Authors

H. Johnson, Department of Plant Sciences
J. W. Cameron, Department of Plant Sciences
O. C. Taylor, University of California, Riverside.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(5):8-9.

Published May 01, 1971

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Abstract

A research project in southern California originally aimed at seeking resistance to sugar cane mosaic virus in sweet corn has also shown that genetic resistance to air pollution also exists in certain varieties. This was not entirely unexpected, since air pollution resistance is known to exist within other plant species. Tobacco varieties, for example, vary widely in susceptibility to ozone; and petunia varieties vary widely in susceptibility to PAN (a photo-chemical pollutant). Smog-resistant varieties of sweet corn should be of particular interest to growers for the summer and fall harvest periods in Los Angeles, Orange, and western Riverside counties.

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Air pollution resistance in sweet corn varieties

H. Johnson, J. W. Cameron, O. C. Taylor
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Air pollution resistance in sweet corn varieties

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

H. Johnson, Department of Plant Sciences
J. W. Cameron, Department of Plant Sciences
O. C. Taylor, University of California, Riverside.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(5):8-9.

Published May 01, 1971

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

A research project in southern California originally aimed at seeking resistance to sugar cane mosaic virus in sweet corn has also shown that genetic resistance to air pollution also exists in certain varieties. This was not entirely unexpected, since air pollution resistance is known to exist within other plant species. Tobacco varieties, for example, vary widely in susceptibility to ozone; and petunia varieties vary widely in susceptibility to PAN (a photo-chemical pollutant). Smog-resistant varieties of sweet corn should be of particular interest to growers for the summer and fall harvest periods in Los Angeles, Orange, and western Riverside counties.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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