California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Egyptian alfalfa weevil …the threat to California alfalfa

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Robert Van Den Bosch, Extension Agronomist, U.C., Davis.
Vern L. Marble, University of California, Berkeley.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(5):3-4.

Published May 01, 1971

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The five articles included here summarize research to date on the Egyptian alfalfa weevil, Hypera brunneipennis, which poses a major threat to most of the state's 1,140,000 acres of alfalfa, and has already caused losses to growers of more than $6 million on a total alfalfa-hay crop valued at $197,000,000 (in 1970). H. brunnelpennis is not to be confused with its more widely known relative, H. postica, which has been an economically important weevil pest for many years, but has been reduced to minor status in some areas through biological control. The Egyptian alfalfa weevil arrived accidentally through the southeastern corner of California in the late 1930's, and became universally distributed over the south coastal plain. It spread slowly, but in recent years has been identified in many of the lowland alfalfa growing valleys of central and northern California…and is expected to expand over the entire Central Valley. As the studies included here indicate, much further research is necessary before an integrated program involving biological control, resistant alfalfa varieties, cultural control and effective chemical control (or combinations of all) can become practical.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Egyptian alfalfa weevil …the threat to California alfalfa

Robert Van Den Bosch, Vern L. Marble
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Egyptian alfalfa weevil …the threat to California alfalfa

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Robert Van Den Bosch, Extension Agronomist, U.C., Davis.
Vern L. Marble, University of California, Berkeley.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(5):3-4.

Published May 01, 1971

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The five articles included here summarize research to date on the Egyptian alfalfa weevil, Hypera brunneipennis, which poses a major threat to most of the state's 1,140,000 acres of alfalfa, and has already caused losses to growers of more than $6 million on a total alfalfa-hay crop valued at $197,000,000 (in 1970). H. brunnelpennis is not to be confused with its more widely known relative, H. postica, which has been an economically important weevil pest for many years, but has been reduced to minor status in some areas through biological control. The Egyptian alfalfa weevil arrived accidentally through the southeastern corner of California in the late 1930's, and became universally distributed over the south coastal plain. It spread slowly, but in recent years has been identified in many of the lowland alfalfa growing valleys of central and northern California…and is expected to expand over the entire Central Valley. As the studies included here indicate, much further research is necessary before an integrated program involving biological control, resistant alfalfa varieties, cultural control and effective chemical control (or combinations of all) can become practical.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu