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Foliar sprays for correcting zinc deficiencies in walnuts

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Authors

K. Uriu, Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis
David H. Chaney, Sutter County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(3):10-11.

Published March 01, 1970

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: ZINC DEFICIENCY is one of the most serious nutritional problems of walnut production in California, and has been very difficult to correct. The most common treatment in past years has been the use of zinc-coated sheet metal strips driven into the sapwood of the tree. This method has been laborious and expensive and has required periodic treatments (every three to four years) to maintain deficiency-free trees. In some soils, trees have responded well to soil applications of zinc, while in other soils they have responded poorly. Soil applications of zinc at levels sufficient to achieve correction have often been very expensive.

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Foliar sprays for correcting zinc deficiencies in walnuts

K. Uriu, David H. Chaney
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Foliar sprays for correcting zinc deficiencies in walnuts

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

K. Uriu, Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis
David H. Chaney, Sutter County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(3):10-11.

Published March 01, 1970

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: ZINC DEFICIENCY is one of the most serious nutritional problems of walnut production in California, and has been very difficult to correct. The most common treatment in past years has been the use of zinc-coated sheet metal strips driven into the sapwood of the tree. This method has been laborious and expensive and has required periodic treatments (every three to four years) to maintain deficiency-free trees. In some soils, trees have responded well to soil applications of zinc, while in other soils they have responded poorly. Soil applications of zinc at levels sufficient to achieve correction have often been very expensive.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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