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Testing fluorine compounds for chemical mowing of turfgrass

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Authors

John H. Madison, University of California
James M. Johnson, University of California
William B. Davis
Roy M. Sachs, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(8):8-10.

Published August 01, 1969

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Abstract

On the basis of present evidence, morphactins, used at low rates, appear to have some regulatory effects on turfgrass growth—stimulating seed yield and flowering, and affecting tillering and degree of culm elongation. However, reductions in leaf growth from morphactins, do not indicate specific growth regulation but appear to be caused by phytotoxicity. Such poisoning generally leads to lowered vigor and reduced ability to recover from wear, insect, and disease attacks, and may increase susceptibility to disease and insects; therefore, the continuing recommendation is for replacement of hybrid bermudagrasses when used for purposes to which they are not suited. When a brown color is not objectionable, a considerable reduction of thatch and clippings can be obtained by withholding irrigation and fertilizer.

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Author notes

Tifgreen bermudagrass for this experiment was donated as sod by Nunes Turf-grass Nurseries, Inc., Patterson, California.

Testing fluorine compounds for chemical mowing of turfgrass

John H. Madison, James M. Johnson, William B. Davis, Roy M. Sachs
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Testing fluorine compounds for chemical mowing of turfgrass

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

John H. Madison, University of California
James M. Johnson, University of California
William B. Davis
Roy M. Sachs, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(8):8-10.

Published August 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

On the basis of present evidence, morphactins, used at low rates, appear to have some regulatory effects on turfgrass growth—stimulating seed yield and flowering, and affecting tillering and degree of culm elongation. However, reductions in leaf growth from morphactins, do not indicate specific growth regulation but appear to be caused by phytotoxicity. Such poisoning generally leads to lowered vigor and reduced ability to recover from wear, insect, and disease attacks, and may increase susceptibility to disease and insects; therefore, the continuing recommendation is for replacement of hybrid bermudagrasses when used for purposes to which they are not suited. When a brown color is not objectionable, a considerable reduction of thatch and clippings can be obtained by withholding irrigation and fertilizer.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Tifgreen bermudagrass for this experiment was donated as sod by Nunes Turf-grass Nurseries, Inc., Patterson, California.


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