California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Accelerating tomato fruit maturity with Ethrel

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Authors

Shuichi Iwahori, University of California
James M. Lyons, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(6):17-18.

Published June 01, 1969

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE NEW GROWTH REGULATOR, Ethrel (2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid), is similar in action to ethylene in its effects on various plant processes: it accelerates post-harvest ripening of tomato, banana, and honeydew melon fruits; it induces flowering in pineapple plants; it causes female flower differentiation in cucumber plants; and it acts as a thinning agent by accelerating abscission of flowers and young fruit in certain trees and by loosening fruit at harvest to aid mechanical harvesting. These experiments were initiated to examine the effects of Ethrel on growth and maturation of tomato fruit on the vine under both greenhouse and field conditions.

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Accelerating tomato fruit maturity with Ethrel

Shuichi Iwahori, James M. Lyons
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Accelerating tomato fruit maturity with Ethrel

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Shuichi Iwahori, University of California
James M. Lyons, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(6):17-18.

Published June 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE NEW GROWTH REGULATOR, Ethrel (2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid), is similar in action to ethylene in its effects on various plant processes: it accelerates post-harvest ripening of tomato, banana, and honeydew melon fruits; it induces flowering in pineapple plants; it causes female flower differentiation in cucumber plants; and it acts as a thinning agent by accelerating abscission of flowers and young fruit in certain trees and by loosening fruit at harvest to aid mechanical harvesting. These experiments were initiated to examine the effects of Ethrel on growth and maturation of tomato fruit on the vine under both greenhouse and field conditions.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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