California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Herbicides and sprinkler irrigation in vegetable crops

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

A. H. Lange, Agricultural Extension Service
M. Lavalleye, University of California
H. Agamalian
B. Fischer
B. Collins
H. Kempen

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(5):8-10.

Published May 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

With the increasing use of sprinkler irrigation on vegetables and other intensively grown crops, has come a need to evaluate herbicide effects. Herbicidal activity is often stepped up under sprinkler irrigation. The degree of crop selectivity may be increased, or decreased, depending upon the herbicide, the soil, the weed species, and the vegetable crop. Sprinkler irrigation advantages have been demonstrated, particularly in areas with saline soils or drainage problems. However, along with increased stands and vigor generally associated with sprinkling, comes an increase in weed populations. And as the cost of hand weeding rises, chemical herbicides become more desirable to the grower. The early use of sprinklers to help germinate the crop and activate the herbicide, even though furrow irrigation is used subsequently, is another promising approach in growing vegetables and other row crops. These observations of recent field tests and commercial applications of herbicides to control weeds under sprinkler irrigation are not to be considered recommendations for use of the herbicides mentioned. For recommendations, refer to University of California Weed Control Recommendations, 1969, or contact local farm advisors.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Cooperation was given by H. Sciaroni and W. Humphrey, Farm Advisors in San Mateo and Orange counties; and H. Johnson, Vegetable Crops Specialist and Bob Hildebrandt, Lab Assistant, U.C., Riverside. The Thompson-Hayward Chemical Company, Eli Lilly Chemical Company, Diamond-Shamrock Chemical Company, Upjohn Chemical Company, Shell Chemical Company, Stauffer Chemical Company, Geigy Chemical Company, and the Rohm & Haas Chemical Company provided partial financial assistance for this project.

Herbicides and sprinkler irrigation in vegetable crops

A. H. Lange, M. Lavalleye, H. Agamalian, B. Fischer, B. Collins, H. Kempen
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Herbicides and sprinkler irrigation in vegetable crops

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

A. H. Lange, Agricultural Extension Service
M. Lavalleye, University of California
H. Agamalian
B. Fischer
B. Collins
H. Kempen

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(5):8-10.

Published May 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

With the increasing use of sprinkler irrigation on vegetables and other intensively grown crops, has come a need to evaluate herbicide effects. Herbicidal activity is often stepped up under sprinkler irrigation. The degree of crop selectivity may be increased, or decreased, depending upon the herbicide, the soil, the weed species, and the vegetable crop. Sprinkler irrigation advantages have been demonstrated, particularly in areas with saline soils or drainage problems. However, along with increased stands and vigor generally associated with sprinkling, comes an increase in weed populations. And as the cost of hand weeding rises, chemical herbicides become more desirable to the grower. The early use of sprinklers to help germinate the crop and activate the herbicide, even though furrow irrigation is used subsequently, is another promising approach in growing vegetables and other row crops. These observations of recent field tests and commercial applications of herbicides to control weeds under sprinkler irrigation are not to be considered recommendations for use of the herbicides mentioned. For recommendations, refer to University of California Weed Control Recommendations, 1969, or contact local farm advisors.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Cooperation was given by H. Sciaroni and W. Humphrey, Farm Advisors in San Mateo and Orange counties; and H. Johnson, Vegetable Crops Specialist and Bob Hildebrandt, Lab Assistant, U.C., Riverside. The Thompson-Hayward Chemical Company, Eli Lilly Chemical Company, Diamond-Shamrock Chemical Company, Upjohn Chemical Company, Shell Chemical Company, Stauffer Chemical Company, Geigy Chemical Company, and the Rohm & Haas Chemical Company provided partial financial assistance for this project.


University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu