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Chemical control of pink bollworm in imperial valley

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Authors

R. E. Rice, University of California
H. T. Reynolds, U.C.
R. M. Hannibal, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(5):19-19.

Published May 01, 1969

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE PINK BOLLWORM, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders) became a major pest of southern California cotton in 1965 and 1966. Since that time, one of the primary methods of controlling this insect has been the use of insecticide sprays. Spray treatments have usually been applied by aircraft at five- or six-day intervals beginning in late June or early July. Because of the protected habitat of the larvae, treatments have normally been directed against the adult moths.

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Author notes

This research was conducted with financial support from the California cotton industry, and with the cooperation of many individual growers.

Chemical control of pink bollworm in imperial valley

R. E. Rice, H. T. Reynolds, R. M. Hannibal
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Chemical control of pink bollworm in imperial valley

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

R. E. Rice, University of California
H. T. Reynolds, U.C.
R. M. Hannibal, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(5):19-19.

Published May 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE PINK BOLLWORM, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders) became a major pest of southern California cotton in 1965 and 1966. Since that time, one of the primary methods of controlling this insect has been the use of insecticide sprays. Spray treatments have usually been applied by aircraft at five- or six-day intervals beginning in late June or early July. Because of the protected habitat of the larvae, treatments have normally been directed against the adult moths.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This research was conducted with financial support from the California cotton industry, and with the cooperation of many individual growers.


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