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Nitrate ion concentration in well water

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Authors

E. C. Shaw
Paul Wiley

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(5):11-11.

Published May 01, 1969

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Abstract

Significant variations in levels of nitrate ion concentration can occur in analysis of water samples collected from the same well. Variations seem to be associated with at least two factors: (1) the time lag between sampling and actual analysis and (2) time of continuous pumping prior to sampling. A nearly two-fold increase in the level of nitrate ion in water samples from Well 1 occurred within four hours, during which the pump was not running, and a 3 1/2-fold increase after 24 hours—pointing to a multiple aquifer source of water, one or more aquifers of which may be the source of NOa concentration in the well water. The change in nitrate ion concentration, with time after sampling, suggests that some undetermined factor is involved that changes nitrates to some other form of nitrogen.

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Nitrate ion concentration in well water

E. C. Shaw, Paul Wiley
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Nitrate ion concentration in well water

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

E. C. Shaw
Paul Wiley

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(5):11-11.

Published May 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Significant variations in levels of nitrate ion concentration can occur in analysis of water samples collected from the same well. Variations seem to be associated with at least two factors: (1) the time lag between sampling and actual analysis and (2) time of continuous pumping prior to sampling. A nearly two-fold increase in the level of nitrate ion in water samples from Well 1 occurred within four hours, during which the pump was not running, and a 3 1/2-fold increase after 24 hours—pointing to a multiple aquifer source of water, one or more aquifers of which may be the source of NOa concentration in the well water. The change in nitrate ion concentration, with time after sampling, suggests that some undetermined factor is involved that changes nitrates to some other form of nitrogen.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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