California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Volume 0, Number 0

Research articles

Addressing organizational climate can potentially reduce sexual harassment of female agricultural workers in California
by Malcolm Hobbs, Emanuelle Klachky, Monica Cooper
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Assessing antecedents for sexual harassment among California's agricultural workers yields insight into the causes and consequences of this behavior and suggests ways to mitigate it.
Workplace sexual harassment (SH) has been highlighted as a key issue for female agricultural workers in the United States. This study investigated how workers' descriptive data (age, job experience, attitudes) and specific organizational variables (how work crews are structured) potentially facilitate SH in an agricultural setting. Harassment was reported by 30% of surveyed female viticulture workers in their current jobs. Harassed women tended to be younger, employed seasonally and working in crews where hostile sexist views were prevalent. Harassment affected worker productivity; harassed women and their male co-workers were less satisfied with their jobs and more likely to seek other employment. Efforts to address SH by restructuring at the level of the field crew may be ineffective. Instead, addressing workers' hostile sexist attitudes and the extent to which an organization tolerates SH appears to have the most promise for reducing SH in agricultural industries.
Low prevalence of handwashing and importance of signage at California county fair animal exhibits
by Melissa T. Ibarra, Cheryl L. Meehan, Miles Daniels, Woutrina A. Smith, Martin H. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Signage showing a link between animal contact and pathogen transmission may lead to increased frequency of handwashing at California County fairs.
Disease outbreaks among visitors at venues where animals are exhibited, such as animal shows at county fairs or petting zoos, are national public health concerns. Zoonotic disease transmission at fairs can occur through a variety of pathways, including direct contact with livestock and indirect exposure through contact with animals' immediate surroundings. Handwashing can reduce pathogen transmission. The goal of this observational study was to determine rates of handwashing among county fair visitors and to learn whether signage and/or contact with animals were correlated with handwashing practice. The investigation was conducted at four county fairs located across two geographic regions of California. Observations occurred over the course of one summer. Results from our observations of fair visitors revealed a low overall prevalence (5%) of handwashing behavior. However, fair visitors who made contact with animals were more likely to wash their hands. Additionally, those individuals who walked through barns where handwashing signage was present were significantly more likely to wash their hands than those who visited barns without signage.
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Volume 0, Number 0

Research articles

Addressing organizational climate can potentially reduce sexual harassment of female agricultural workers in California
by Malcolm Hobbs, Emanuelle Klachky, Monica Cooper
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Assessing antecedents for sexual harassment among California's agricultural workers yields insight into the causes and consequences of this behavior and suggests ways to mitigate it.
Workplace sexual harassment (SH) has been highlighted as a key issue for female agricultural workers in the United States. This study investigated how workers' descriptive data (age, job experience, attitudes) and specific organizational variables (how work crews are structured) potentially facilitate SH in an agricultural setting. Harassment was reported by 30% of surveyed female viticulture workers in their current jobs. Harassed women tended to be younger, employed seasonally and working in crews where hostile sexist views were prevalent. Harassment affected worker productivity; harassed women and their male co-workers were less satisfied with their jobs and more likely to seek other employment. Efforts to address SH by restructuring at the level of the field crew may be ineffective. Instead, addressing workers' hostile sexist attitudes and the extent to which an organization tolerates SH appears to have the most promise for reducing SH in agricultural industries.
Low prevalence of handwashing and importance of signage at California county fair animal exhibits
by Melissa T. Ibarra, Cheryl L. Meehan, Miles Daniels, Woutrina A. Smith, Martin H. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Signage showing a link between animal contact and pathogen transmission may lead to increased frequency of handwashing at California County fairs.
Disease outbreaks among visitors at venues where animals are exhibited, such as animal shows at county fairs or petting zoos, are national public health concerns. Zoonotic disease transmission at fairs can occur through a variety of pathways, including direct contact with livestock and indirect exposure through contact with animals' immediate surroundings. Handwashing can reduce pathogen transmission. The goal of this observational study was to determine rates of handwashing among county fair visitors and to learn whether signage and/or contact with animals were correlated with handwashing practice. The investigation was conducted at four county fairs located across two geographic regions of California. Observations occurred over the course of one summer. Results from our observations of fair visitors revealed a low overall prevalence (5%) of handwashing behavior. However, fair visitors who made contact with animals were more likely to wash their hands. Additionally, those individuals who walked through barns where handwashing signage was present were significantly more likely to wash their hands than those who visited barns without signage.

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