California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Protecting young trees from attack by the pacific flatheaded borer

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Authors

L. B. Mcnelly
D. H. Chaney
G. R. Post
C. S. Davis, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(4):12-13.

Published April 01, 1969

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Abstract

Exterior white latex paint applied to trunks of young trees before flatheaded borer eggs were deposited, but after bud break, prevented sunburn and reduced borer attacks—and was as effective as any other material tested in these studies.

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Author notes

Assistance with plot and laboratory work was obtained from Hillary Ewing, Laboratory Assistant, U.C., Berkeley. Orchard space, storage space and assistance with plot work were furnished by Mel Nunes and Ed Sarmento, Sutter County ranchers. The above work was supported in part by the United States Public Health Service Grant U1535–03, Solid Waste Program, Environmental Control Administration, National Center for Urban and Industrial Health.

Protecting young trees from attack by the pacific flatheaded borer

L. B. Mcnelly, D. H. Chaney, G. R. Post, C. S. Davis
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Protecting young trees from attack by the pacific flatheaded borer

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

L. B. Mcnelly
D. H. Chaney
G. R. Post
C. S. Davis, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(4):12-13.

Published April 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Exterior white latex paint applied to trunks of young trees before flatheaded borer eggs were deposited, but after bud break, prevented sunburn and reduced borer attacks—and was as effective as any other material tested in these studies.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Assistance with plot and laboratory work was obtained from Hillary Ewing, Laboratory Assistant, U.C., Berkeley. Orchard space, storage space and assistance with plot work were furnished by Mel Nunes and Ed Sarmento, Sutter County ranchers. The above work was supported in part by the United States Public Health Service Grant U1535–03, Solid Waste Program, Environmental Control Administration, National Center for Urban and Industrial Health.


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