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Chaparral fires change soil moisture depletion patterns

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Authors

C. M. McKell, University of California
J. R. Goodin, University of California
C. C. Duncan, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 22(11):15-16.

Published November 01, 1968

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Abstract

Wildfires in Chaparral Occur with amazing regularity and consume a tremendous amount of fuel. Published figures indicate that the average fire in chamise consumes between 15 and 25 tons of fuel. However, only temporary changes in vegetation occur as a result of the fire; the resprouting habit of most chaparral species insures that there will be abundant fuel for the next fire. The relatively small changes in vegetation consist primarily of dramatic but short-duration increases in annual species.

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Chaparral fires change soil moisture depletion patterns

C. M. McKell, J. R. Goodin, C. C. Duncan
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Chaparral fires change soil moisture depletion patterns

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

C. M. McKell, University of California
J. R. Goodin, University of California
C. C. Duncan, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 22(11):15-16.

Published November 01, 1968

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Wildfires in Chaparral Occur with amazing regularity and consume a tremendous amount of fuel. Published figures indicate that the average fire in chamise consumes between 15 and 25 tons of fuel. However, only temporary changes in vegetation occur as a result of the fire; the resprouting habit of most chaparral species insures that there will be abundant fuel for the next fire. The relatively small changes in vegetation consist primarily of dramatic but short-duration increases in annual species.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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