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Insect damage to sesame… and control possibilities

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Authors

Elmer C. Carlson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(11):14-15.

Published November 01, 1967

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Abstract

Studies of both the flower thrips and lygus bug indicate that they caused no serious sesame plant injury, reduction of pod set, or seed loss at the populations existing under the conditions of these experiments. It appeared that much larger population densities of these pests would be necessary to contribute to the poor pod set and low yields observed recently on untreated field plants. The green peach aphid caused up to 27% seed loss when present in moderate to large numbers, however. The aphid was effectively controlled by use of two applications of either oxydemetonmethyl or endosulfan.

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Author notes

John Campbell, Nurseryman, Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, assisted with these studies, as did members of the Department of Agronomy, U. C., Davis (conducted as a part of project no. 1565).

Insect damage to sesame… and control possibilities

Elmer C. Carlson
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Insect damage to sesame… and control possibilities

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Elmer C. Carlson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(11):14-15.

Published November 01, 1967

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Studies of both the flower thrips and lygus bug indicate that they caused no serious sesame plant injury, reduction of pod set, or seed loss at the populations existing under the conditions of these experiments. It appeared that much larger population densities of these pests would be necessary to contribute to the poor pod set and low yields observed recently on untreated field plants. The green peach aphid caused up to 27% seed loss when present in moderate to large numbers, however. The aphid was effectively controlled by use of two applications of either oxydemetonmethyl or endosulfan.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

John Campbell, Nurseryman, Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, assisted with these studies, as did members of the Department of Agronomy, U. C., Davis (conducted as a part of project no. 1565).


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