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Effects of different rootstocks, and degree of psylla infestation on leaf curl in young pear trees

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Authors

W. H. Griggs, University of California
D. D. Jensen, U. C., Berkeley
B. T. Iwakiri, U. C., Davis
J. A. Beutel, U. C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(10):16-20.

Published October 01, 1967

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Abstract

Differences in pear varieties, source of scion wood, and kind of rootstock had little effect on the incidence of leaf curl in these tests. Psylla are evidently the vectors of curl and there appears to be little hope of controlling the disease through selection of propagating material, unless psylla are excluded. If not infected in the nursery row, many pear trees may quickly become infected in the young orchard even under the best commercial spray program.

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Effects of different rootstocks, and degree of psylla infestation on leaf curl in young pear trees

W. H. Griggs, D. D. Jensen, B. T. Iwakiri, J. A. Beutel
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Effects of different rootstocks, and degree of psylla infestation on leaf curl in young pear trees

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. H. Griggs, University of California
D. D. Jensen, U. C., Berkeley
B. T. Iwakiri, U. C., Davis
J. A. Beutel, U. C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(10):16-20.

Published October 01, 1967

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Differences in pear varieties, source of scion wood, and kind of rootstock had little effect on the incidence of leaf curl in these tests. Psylla are evidently the vectors of curl and there appears to be little hope of controlling the disease through selection of propagating material, unless psylla are excluded. If not infected in the nursery row, many pear trees may quickly become infected in the young orchard even under the best commercial spray program.

Full text

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