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Research with parasites for biological control of house flies in southern California

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Authors

E. F. Legner, University of California
E. C. Bay, University of California
H. W. Brydon
C. W. McCoy

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(4):10-11.

Published April 01, 1966

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Abstract

The introduction of new exotic species of larval and pupal parasites (probably from the Eastern Hemisphere) and the artificial distribution of existing parasites appear to offer the most immediate means for a more successful biological control effort in southern California, especially against Musca domestica, the most common of the house flies. Existing parasites are, how-ever, not as effective against this species as they are against Fannia and certain other species.

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Author notes

This study was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health, U. S. Public Health Service and from the California Department of Public Health Fly Control Research Project.

Research with parasites for biological control of house flies in southern California

E. F. Legner, E. C. Bay, H. W. Brydon, C. W. McCoy
Webmaster Email: sjosterman@ucanr.edu

Research with parasites for biological control of house flies in southern California

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

E. F. Legner, University of California
E. C. Bay, University of California
H. W. Brydon
C. W. McCoy

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(4):10-11.

Published April 01, 1966

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The introduction of new exotic species of larval and pupal parasites (probably from the Eastern Hemisphere) and the artificial distribution of existing parasites appear to offer the most immediate means for a more successful biological control effort in southern California, especially against Musca domestica, the most common of the house flies. Existing parasites are, how-ever, not as effective against this species as they are against Fannia and certain other species.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This study was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health, U. S. Public Health Service and from the California Department of Public Health Fly Control Research Project.


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