California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Effects of cold on cereal crops

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Authors

C. A. Suneso, University of California
M. D. Miller, Agricultural Extension Service, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 18(8):8-10.

Published August 01, 1964

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Abstract

Frost damage to the floral parts of grain heads (prior to, during and immediately after pollination) is surprisingly common in California, other mountain states, and many cereal-growing areas in the world. Development of early maturing varieties has intensified the problem in all areas, particularly where cereals are fall sown. Many seed and fruit crops also can be damaged by frost. Most plants are extremely sensitive to temperature in stages of rapid growth and reproduction. This is especially true of plant reproductive organs.

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Effects of cold on cereal crops

C. A. Suneso, M. D. Miller
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Effects of cold on cereal crops

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

C. A. Suneso, University of California
M. D. Miller, Agricultural Extension Service, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 18(8):8-10.

Published August 01, 1964

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Frost damage to the floral parts of grain heads (prior to, during and immediately after pollination) is surprisingly common in California, other mountain states, and many cereal-growing areas in the world. Development of early maturing varieties has intensified the problem in all areas, particularly where cereals are fall sown. Many seed and fruit crops also can be damaged by frost. Most plants are extremely sensitive to temperature in stages of rapid growth and reproduction. This is especially true of plant reproductive organs.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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