California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Controlling dry spots on golf greens

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

F. W. Dorman
C. L. Hemstreet
T. M. Little, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 18(8):2-3.

Published August 01, 1964

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Monthly aerifying was an aid to controlling the development of dry spots and did not cause cumulative injury on a Seaside bentgrass green during 1963 summer tests in San Bernardino County. Verticutting during the summer heat caused some injury to this fine turfgrass, but was also of some value in controlling dry spot development as thatch built up late in the season. Wetting agents aided in controlling dry spot development, but were detrimental to the appearance of the turf on this green. The tests also proved that it is possible to conduct complex experimental work on golf greens, if the management and players understand the importance of the work and the research is scheduled to cause a minimum of inconvenience to the golfers. Inexperienced judges were found capable of appraising visual effects of different management practices on the turf.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Controlling dry spots on golf greens

F. W. Dorman, C. L. Hemstreet, T. M. Little
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Controlling dry spots on golf greens

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

F. W. Dorman
C. L. Hemstreet
T. M. Little, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 18(8):2-3.

Published August 01, 1964

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Monthly aerifying was an aid to controlling the development of dry spots and did not cause cumulative injury on a Seaside bentgrass green during 1963 summer tests in San Bernardino County. Verticutting during the summer heat caused some injury to this fine turfgrass, but was also of some value in controlling dry spot development as thatch built up late in the season. Wetting agents aided in controlling dry spot development, but were detrimental to the appearance of the turf on this green. The tests also proved that it is possible to conduct complex experimental work on golf greens, if the management and players understand the importance of the work and the research is scheduled to cause a minimum of inconvenience to the golfers. Inexperienced judges were found capable of appraising visual effects of different management practices on the turf.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: https://calag.ucanr.edu