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Flower thrips damages safflower: —Buds bronzed and blasted

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Authors

Elmer C. Carlson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 16(4):4-4.

Published April 01, 1962

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Abstract

Safflower plants are particularly susceptible to damage due to flower thrips feeding, according to investigations started in 1961. Observations of plants and fields indicated that many young buds of safflower planted from early to mid season were turning bronze in color and were showing blast damage. This damage to the developing buds had previously been attributed entirely to lygus bugs, but much of this injury occurred early in May and prior to the onset of high lygus populations in the Davis area.

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Author notes

Based on research conducted under Project Number 1565. John Campbell, Davis nurseryman assisted with the study. Cooperation was also received from the Agronomy Department, U. C., Davis; oil processing companies, pest control operators, and chemical companies.

Flower thrips damages safflower: —Buds bronzed and blasted

Elmer C. Carlson
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Flower thrips damages safflower: —Buds bronzed and blasted

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Elmer C. Carlson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 16(4):4-4.

Published April 01, 1962

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Safflower plants are particularly susceptible to damage due to flower thrips feeding, according to investigations started in 1961. Observations of plants and fields indicated that many young buds of safflower planted from early to mid season were turning bronze in color and were showing blast damage. This damage to the developing buds had previously been attributed entirely to lygus bugs, but much of this injury occurred early in May and prior to the onset of high lygus populations in the Davis area.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Based on research conducted under Project Number 1565. John Campbell, Davis nurseryman assisted with the study. Cooperation was also received from the Agronomy Department, U. C., Davis; oil processing companies, pest control operators, and chemical companies.


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